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Marketing: This Is A Contact Sport

Marketing: This Is A Contact Sport

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For the longest time, marketing and advertising were the equivalents of passive sports. A role in either field was sort of like being an armchair quarterback, you could see what was going on, yell and scream all you wanted, but at the end of the day, you had little impact on the outcome (if any at all).

And people prefer it that way.

Why do you think that it seems like only a select few pros in the world of sports manage to excel? I don’t mean excel against other professionals, but against everyone else who has ever played or thought about playing in their respective sports.

They’re willing to take the hits; they’re in a “contact sport” mindset, even if they’re playing golf.

Over the last 10 to 15 years, marketing has shifted. This is undeniable as more people are searching for different ways to get their message out. While the rise of both social media and mobile marketing have certainly facilitated this change, organizations like BNI and events like an Unconference are also contributing.

We have shifted into a contact sport scenario for marketing, and most people don’t like it.

You can’t sit in a comfortable chair, yelling out plays, celebrating when things go well, and blaming someone else when they don’t. You have to move, think, strategize, and take repeated hits to gain momentum and succeed. And that’s not easy.

In football, the best quarterbacks have a support network of trainers, coaches, teammates, friends, family members, and mentors who are all there helping them get to the next level.

The companies or organizations that excel in any given field heavily rely on this contact sport mentality to be the separation between them and their competition.

Although a commonly used example for this mindset, Gary Vaynerchuk from Wine Library TV, and now Vayner Media is a shining example of what is possible when you have a contact sport attitude. With little more than a handy cam, and some trust from his father / business partner, Gary started on a path that would forever change the wine industry, social media industry, and more importantly, his life.

Recording a daily show for Wine Library TV, Gary would then spend hours on Twitter and Search.Twitter.Com (which was called Summize at the time) connecting with people and conversations.

His level of success was only viable because he got off his couch, and into the game.

By: Josh Muirhead

Founder of Socialmark Media, I’m the guy who reads  to much when on vacation, and will receive odd looks when I’m try new things.

I make my living from  presentations, sessions, and consultations and work extremely hard to stay just ahead of most people when it comes to digital communications. My core work philosophy is: “You don’t need a social media plan…You Need A Business Strategy”

This is what inspires my work –  {Excerpt from Seth Godin’s Poke The Box}

“If you had a chance to do a TED talk, what would it be about? What have you discovered, what do you know, what can you teach? You should do one. Even if you don’t do one, you should be prepared to do one.

That’s your opportunity – to approach your work in a way that generates unique learning and interactions that are worth sharing.”

Interested in joining the Social Media Week Global Editorial Team? Apply here!

 


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