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Social Media Week

A Look Through Social Media at Our Host Cities: Buenos Aries

A Look Through Social Media at Our Host Cities: Buenos Aries

Monday, September 12th, 2011

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We’re in the final stretch now social mendia fans. Only one week away from Social Media Week! Sheldon from Sysomos here once again with a sneak peek at one of our final host cities for next week. This post I’ll be taking us on a journey down to South America to check out the social media scene in Buenos Aries, Argentina.

Using Sysomos MAP, our industry leading social media monitoring and analytics platform, I ran a query to pull up all social media information that has been marked as coming from Buenos Aries. In the past six months, I was able to find 370,355 blog posts, 186,976 forum postings and 12.5 million tweets.

I then trended out these social media instances over time. Like almost every city we’ve looked at so far in these posts we can see a rise in Twitter activity around the middle of April. What’s interesting though is the large dip it takes around July 1-5. I tried to dig deeper into that drop and found that there were no clear reasons for it being spoken about. The only clue towards something that I could find was that it was the first five days of the Copa América, a month long football (soccer for the North Americans) tournament mainly between South American countries. However, witnessing the World Cup last year, it’s hard to believe that a football tournament would cause a drop, rather than a spike, in Twitter activity. If you live in Buenos Aries and can help explain that five day drop in tweets, please leave a comment and let us know.

 

Next, I pulled up a wordcloud. The wordcloud shows us the most popular words being used in social media coming from Buenos Aries. When you look at this wordcloud it’s hard to paint a story as these are the most popular words over the past six months, but you can get an idea of things being heavily discussed in Buenos Aries.

Now that we’ve seen some of the social media activity coming from Buenos Aries, I wanted to probe a bit further and find out who was creating it all. I first looked at the age of bloggers in Buenos Aries and was pleased to find that people of all ages are blogging in the Argentinean capital. In fact, the age demographics were split almost into into quarters with bloggers 20 and under counting for 23.4%, those 21 to 35 counting for 31.9%, 36-50 accounting for 28.7% and the final 15.8% being made up by bloggers 51 and older. There was also another close split in terms of the gender of these bloggers. Males make up 58% of Buenos Aries’ bloggers while females make up the remaining 42%.

Another interesting thing I found from the bloggers in Buenos Aries was the number of topics their blogs cover. There is a broad range of blog topics and one topic doesn’t out shadow the rest like I’ve noticed in a few of the other cities I’ve explored so far. The largest group of bloggers in Buenos Aries fall into the student category and make up 18.6%. The second larget blogging topic is communications and marketing, coming in at 17.6%, followed by the arts at 16.2% and education at 11.2%.

Moving over to Twitter, I was able to pull information regarding the gender of tweeters in Buenos Aries using a Sysomos industry exclusive technology. Again, I found a very close split in the genders of Twitter users with females making up 46% and males the other 54%. I think that this data has shown us that people of all ages and both genders are heavily involved in social media in Buenos Aries.

Next, it was time to look at some actual talk regarding social media. Someone pointed out in one of my previous posts that the activity shown in this section seems low in most cities. That’s somewhat true. The numbers do seem a tad low, but that’s because when I’ve been conducting these searches I look for the term “social media” and different variations of it depending on the city’s language. The results that show up are showing us all the instances that “social media” appears. Because social media is becoming more common, a lot of people refer to social media without actually using the words now. For instance, they’ll speak about about a specific social network like Twitter or Facebook, which counts as social media, but may not actually say those words. I’ve found that searching for mentions of social media shows us enough talk about the general subject, but also shows us which networks and other things are being talked about most in conjunction with that over arching query.

Over the past six months in Buenos Aries I was able to find 565 blog posts, only 5 forum postings and 10,076 tweets that mentioned social media.

The next thing I looked at was the buzzgraph that was created by searching for mentions of social media in Buenos Aries. The buzzgraph shows us connections of words that are being used most in conjunction with our search term. From the looks of the terms here, it seems that there is a lot of talk about social media for business being discussed. In fact, the spanish word for business, “negocio” can be found. We can also see words such as “market,” herramienta” which means tool, “consumidores” which means consumer and “estrategia” which means strategy among the other words in this buzzgraph.

Lastly, I like to close these posts by listing the top 10 words that i found as being associated with social media in Buenos Aries. It is the hope that these lists let people know what is most on people’s minds regarding social media in our host cities and leads to interesting conversations next week. The top 10 words I found coming from Buenos Aries are:

  • Market
  • Empresa (company)
  • Facebook
  • Redes (networks)
  • Twitter
  • Usuario (users)
  • Herramienta (tool)
  • Cliente (clients)
  • Estrategia (strategy)
  • Negocio (business)
That’s all for our look at Buenos Aries. Look out for a few more posts from me this week as I finish off exploring our host cities in anticipation of Social Media Week next week.
As always, feel free to leave me comments about anything you see here or things you would like to see in a future analysis of other cities. As well, if you’re from Buenos Aries and can help explain that major Twitter dip in July, I’d love to hear what you have to say.

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