Mediapocalypse! Ian Schafer of Deep Focus to Explore Platforms’ Leverage Over Media

Platforms such as Facebook, Pinterest, Snapchat, and Twitter are up-ending the media business. But will that end up killing it in the process? Publishers and advertisers, content producers and creators, advertisers and agencies are all dealing with the repercussions of distributed media models. But, can the business we’re in as-we-know-it survive the amount of change necessary?

Ian Schafer, the Founder and Chairman of Deep Focus, along with Ricky Van Veen (College Humor and IAC Executive) and Lisa Weinstein (President of Global Digital, Data and Analytics at Starcom Media Group) will explore the (possible) end of times in media, publishing, and everything in-between.

Join us at SMW New York for this session, “Mediapocalypse! Are Platforms Killing The Business Of Media And Advertising? And Why Won’t Anyone Talk About It?” taking place on Tuesday, February 23rd at 2:30pm on the FWD Stage at The TimesCenter.


★ Register today by purchasing your pass ★


About Ian Schafer

Ian Schafer has been at the forefront of advertising since 1997. A trailblazer who saw the potential of digital and the opportunities it offered for advertising, Ian founded Deep Focus in 2002. The award-winning global agency is lauded for its expertise and excellence in digitally led creative execution and media strategy, innovative agency operational models and consumer insights that drive engaging, value-driven experiences. Ian previously served as Vice President of New Media at Disney’s Miramax Films.

In 2007, he was named an Advertising Age Media Maven and in 2009, he was included on the list of Adweek’s Young Ones. Recognized by the Shorty Awards as Best CEO with a Social Media Presence, Ian is known for his unique perspective on everything from new technology and shifts in consumer culture and media consumption to traditional marketing and advertising. (via Deep Focus).

View The Initial Program Of Events for SMW New York

Social Media Week New York, now in it’s 8th year, brings together thousands of professionals in marketing, media and technology. We’re excited to announce the initial schedule and speaker lineup for SMW New York, which takes place this February 22-26.

Join us across our two official venues, and hear from organizations such as Ogilvy, Starcom MediaVest, MRY, Forbes, Mashable, MTV, The Economist, GE, Pinterest, Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, Spotify and many more!

Register for SMW New York

If you’d like to hear from visionary speakers, and join the thousands of attendees that come to Social Media Week in New York each year, register today by purchasing your pass. You can also save 20% until January 14th!

Image Credit: about.me/ian

Starcom Media Group’s Lisa Weinstein Joins #SMWNYC to Examine the New Age of Publishers and Advertisers

Platforms such as Facebook, Pinterest, Snapchat, and Twitter are up-ending the media business. But will that end up killing it in the process? Publishers and advertisers, content producers and creators, advertisers and agencies are all dealing with the repercussions of distributed media models. But, can the business we’re in as-we-know-it survive the amount of change necessary?

Lisa Weinstein (President of Global Digital, Data and Analytics at Starcom Media Group), along with Ian Schafer (Founder and Chairman of Deep Focus) and Ricky Van Veen (College Humor and IAC) will explore the (possible) end of times in media, publishing, and everything in-between.

Join us at SMW New York for this session, “Mediapocalypse! Are Platforms Killing The Business Of Media And Advertising? And Why Won’t Anyone Talk About It?” taking place on Tuesday, February 23rd at 2:30pm on the FWD Stage at The TimesCenter.


★ Register today by purchasing your pass ★


About Lisa Weinstein

As President of Global Digital, Data & Analytics for Starcom MediaVest Group (SMG), Lisa Weinstein leads digital and analytics capabilities for the company. She oversees all aspects of SMG’s digital expertise, including online, mobile, social, search, performance marketing, data, and analytics. Lisa’s leadership serves as a digital guide for many of the biggest marketers in the world, including Coca-Cola, P&G, and Microsoft.

Since joining SMG in 2011, Lisa has established the company’s ranking as a leading agency partner with Facebook, Google, and Microsoft and forged early-adopter relationships with social analytics partners like ShareThis and Visible Measures. She is leading SMG’s transformation into a data-driven, digital, and content-led business currently accounting for a near majority of the total global business.

A testament to the digital capability built under Lisa’s leadership, Forrester Research recently cited SMG among the leaders in the new interactive landscape—the first time a media agency has received this acknowledgement from Forrester. Outside of her work with Media groups, Lisa serves as an advisor for a number of start-ups in the media and ad-tech base. She is also a member of Google’s Global Media Council, the Forbes Executive Women’s Board, the AAF Board of Directors, and the IAB Agency Advisory Board

Prior to joining SMG, Lisa ran Mindshare Chicago where at 32-years-old she was the youngest person to ever run an office for the agency. In this post, she oversaw nearly 200 employees and more than $1 billion in billings for brands including BP, Motorola, Kimberly-Clark, and Abbott Laboratories. She also led operations to win nine new clients, doubling its size during her tenure.
Lisa’s achievements have earned her numerous professional honors, including induction into the AAF Hall of Achievement and recognition in Advertising Age and Crain’s Chicago Business “40 Under 40,” iMedia 25 Innovators List, and MediaWeek’s “Media All-Star.” (via LinkedIn)

View The Initial Program Of Events for SMW New York

Social Media Week New York, now in it’s 8th year, brings together thousands of professionals in marketing, media and technology. We’re excited to announce the initial schedule and speaker lineup for SMW New York, which takes place this February 22-26.

Join us across our two official venues, and hear from organizations such as Ogilvy, Starcom MediaVest, MRY, Forbes, Mashable, MTV, The Economist, GE, Pinterest, Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, Spotify and many more!

Register for SMW New York

If you’d like to hear from visionary speakers, and join the thousands of attendees that come to Social Media Week in New York each year, register today by purchasing your pass. You can also save 20% until January 14th!

Glenn Minerley of Momentum Worldwide Will Share at #SMWNYC How Social and Live Events Best Work Together

You’ve all seen someone recording an entire show on their phone instead of watching it. Sure, the video looks great and yes, they get some Likes, but is it worth the distraction? Isn’t it better to just be “in the moment?” Or, is there a chance the moment is only important because it’s been captured? Did the band win you over if they didn’t make your playlist?

Social media has an overarching role in almost every experience millennials have – but does it improve the live concert experience, before, during or after the show? Sometimes life tells us “No” (like the example above) but the funny thing is that the research – giving a voice to those fans – says “Yes.”

At SMW New York, Glenn Minerley, VP Group Account Director, Music and Entertainment Momentum Worldwide, will discuss these questions and themes alongside leaders from StubHub, AEG Global Partnerships, and Atlantic Records. The session, “How Social Has Rocked the Live Music Experience” takes place Wednesday, February 24th at 4:30pm on the FWD Stage at The TimesCenter.


★ Register today by purchasing your pass ★


About Glenn Minerley

Glenn Minerley has been with Momentum for over nine years. He has been influential in developing the successes of multiple client relationships for Momentum including American Express, HP, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, Nike, Verizon Wireless and others. Leveraging his extensive background in music and entertainment, Glenn is often asked to consult on areas of ticketing, loyalty programs, and music and entertainment platform development for clients around the globe.

With over 15 years of industry experience, Glenn has been instrumental in driving some of the industry’s most successful integrated offerings for clients; focusing on multiple disciplines including sponsorship, experiential, social media and shopper marketing. In addition to launching the global entertainment access program for American Express, Glenn has produced multiple private concerts with superstar acts such as Macklemore, Elton John, Sting, Jimmy Buffet, the Eagles and more.

Throughout his tenure, Glenn has had the opportunity to create and develop consumer engagement activations with properties across the entertainment value chain. In order to deliver for the Momentum client portfolio, Glenn regularly relies on his industry relationships with partners like Live Nation, AEG, CAA, William Morris Entertainment, Sony Pictures, Ticketmaster, Telecharge and more.

As the head of Music & Entertainment for Momentum, Glenn serves as a touchstone for the agency; leveraged across all music related activations and negotiations and looked to for expertise on feasibility, talent selection, and industry relationships (via LinkedIn)

View The Initial Program Of Events for SMW New York

Social Media Week New York, now in it’s 8th year, brings together thousands of professionals in marketing, media and technology. We’re excited to announce the initial schedule and speaker lineup for SMW New York, which takes place this February 22-26.

Join us across our two official venues, and hear from organizations such as Ogilvy, Starcom MediaVest, MRY, Forbes, Mashable, MTV, The Economist, GE, Pinterest, Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, Spotify and many more!

Register for SMW New York

If you’d like to hear from these speakers, and join the thousands of attendees that come to Social Media Week in New York each year, register today by purchasing your pass. You can also save 20% until January 14th!

Ricky Van Veen of CollegeHumor and Vimeo Will Discuss Content and Distributed Media Models at #SMWNYC

Platforms such as Facebook, Pinterest, Snapchat, and Twitter are up-ending the media business. But will that end up killing it in the process? Publishers and advertisers, content producers and creators, advertisers and agencies are all dealing with the repercussions of distributed media models. But, can the business we’re in as-we-know-it survive the amount of change necessary?

Ricky Van Veen (College Humor and IAC Executive), along with Ian Schafer (Founder and Chairman of Deep Focus) and Lisa Weinstein (President of Starcom Media Group) will explore the (possible) end of times in media, publishing, and everything in-between.

Join us at SMW New York for this session, “Mediapocalypse! Are Platforms Killing The Business Of Media And Advertising? And Why Won’t Anyone Talk About It?” taking place on Tuesday, February 23rd at 2:30pm on the FWD Stage at The TimesCenter.


★ Register today by purchasing your pass ★


About Ricky Van Veen

Ricky Van Veen is one of the principal owners and founders of Connected Ventures, a company formed around CollegeHumor that included BustedTees and Vimeo. He created the site as a student at Wake Forest, and was earning around $10-15 million a year before the partners sold a controlling stake to IAC, where Ricky is now an executive.

In 2009, Van Veen was appointed to become the CEO of the new production company, Notional, which produced material for traditional television. One of Notional’s most noteworthy TV shows is “Chopped” on the Food Network.

Ricky Van Veen also appears in some of CollegeHumor’s video series such as Jake and Amir and Hardly Working, as well as the former MTV program, The CollegeHumor Show.

View The Initial Program Of Events for SMW New York

Social Media Week New York, now in it’s 8th year, brings together thousands of professionals in marketing, media and technology. We’re excited to announce the initial schedule and speaker lineup for SMW New York, which takes place this February 22-26.

Join us across our two official venues, and hear from organizations such as Ogilvy, Starcom MediaVest, MRY, Forbes, Mashable, MTV, The Economist, GE, Pinterest, Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, Spotify and many more!

Register for SMW New York

If you’d like to hear from visionary speakers, and join the thousands of attendees that come to Social Media Week in New York each year, register today by purchasing your pass. You can also save 20% until January 14th!

Image Credit: WPR

The Modern Journalist: News Outlets Or Everyday Individuals?

Lou Ferrara of the Associated Press, along with panelists spanning the news and media landscape, threw out the idea of the modern “news agenda” and how it is defined, determined, and acted upon, especially in a society where social media makes information more accessible and easier to demand in real time.

News Assignment Editor at Buzzfeed, Tom Namako, explained BuzzFeed’s original reporting to break stories. They often rely on cues from social media to help shape their efforts. For example, Namako cited the recent Chapel Hill shooting as an example of a case that saw a greater demand for information on social before it even made major headlines.

David Reiter of ABC News expressed a similar sentiment, even calling it “empowering” to know what the audience cares about. Gawker’s Elizabeth Spiers pointed out that years ago, individuals were forced to evaluate whichever news was delivered to them, but today, there is an abundance of information that brings society the responsibility of evaluating it all themselves.

Ferrara asks the panel about the role of social media and data in the news cycle, and whether it adds value to news consumption. Spiers expressed that even if the analytics say the only thing people want to hear about is Miley Cyrus and kittens, it isn’t going to become a threat to legitimate news sources such as the Associated Press or the Washington Post.

Eventually, the session brought in Millennials, and whether this technological drive in reporting is exclusive to Gen-Y. Although Spiers pointed out that millennials enjoy shared experiences more than previous generations, Miklos Sarvary of the Columbia Business School argued that everyone is now involved in social media.

The author of this article is Alex Rea. He is a student in New York City and a Communications & Marketing Intern for Crowdcentric.

Synchronizing The Social At The New York Times

The New York Times are experiencing a phase of rapid change. While social has been top of mind recently, they decided to pull together the disparate parties working on various aspects of “search” and “media” to create a unified, collaborative front for their search and social strategies. They treat each social platform differently, and find unique uses for each one while not abandoning the others. For example, they print an 800-word article for the magazine, and then allow content that didn’t make it into print to live as a longer web piece. Aside from their internal marketing teams, what’s clear is that they value (need) journalists who have a native understanding of how their content can most effectively reverberate through all of the possible strands of media distribution.

Jenna Wortham, a journalist for the Times, explained how her natural affinity manifests; when she tweets, she reveals her process providing readers an inside look at the ‘day in the life’. She doesn’t think it’s a great use of social media to solely promote yourself or your company with clicks. She says the more you engage – and what I think she means is invest yourself – the more people will follow even if there is no click back. That is, invest with content that is interesting, relatable, and shareable. The editor working on audience development pointed out that she found the most shareable stories to be ones of personal perseverance, service-oriented stories, stories that provoke discussion, and ones that appeal to a bit of readers narcissism (said affectionately). People want to share things that make them look “smart”.

The most important takeaway of the session for me was that people need a sense of continuity as opposed to being inundated by a barrage of content. There most be something to come back to or tune into again and again. Food for thought.



Chauncey Zalkin, Co-founder and Creative Director, Show Love. Show Love creates highly shareable documentary video for lovable companies. Check out our reel.

BuzzFeed’s Advice For Creating Emotional Bonds to Video Content

“Content is King, Distribution is Queen, and she wears the pants.” One phrase that resonated with many attendees during John Perelman’s session. Perelman, the Vice President of Buzzfeed Motion Pictures, discussed BuzzFeed’s goals on reaching specific niches and groups with the intention that their videos will gain more shares, especially if the viewer forms an emotional connection to the video (i.e. “A left-hander living in a right-handed world”).

By creating videos that people emotionally bond with, these individuals are more likely to remember, share, and recommend that video to others, eventually building a community within itself! BuzzFeed definitely has the intention to “make you feel some type of way” while viewing those videos!

Currently a student at Queens College, I hope to work in the Entertainment and Media world. As for now, you’ll find me on all forms of Social Media. Tweet me: @graciaskristine

10 Years Of Digital: A Fireside Chat With Pete Cashmore, Founder And CEO Of Mashable

Since Pete Cashmore created Mashable in Scotland a decade ago, its goal has been to document the digital revolution and how it empowers and inspires people around the globe.

Pete Cashmore-10In their 10 years of existence, Mashable has been witness to a lot, from the the rise of social networks like Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat, to the fall of world leaders. They’ve seen the spread of social media to all corners of the globe and reported on its profound impact and influence on nearly every aspect of our daily lives. Mashable has grown up from a small, one-author blog about web tools and emerging social networks to the web’s largest independent news website dedicated to covering digital culture, social media and technology.

From the start, Mashable followed the rise of Web 2.0 and the way it reimagined the way people communicated, collaborated and shared ideas and information. Fast-forward to today, and technology has impacted nearly every facet of our daily lives, from the way we do business to the way we interact with media and entertainment.

On Thursday February 26, join Pete Cashmore, Founder and CEO of Mashable, in conversation with Toby Daniels, Founder of Social Media Week and CEO of Crowdcentric, as they take a look at how digital media has evolved and where it’s heading.

 

For more information on Pete Cashmore‘s talk and to secure your pass for the week, visit Social Media Week.

 

How To Thrive In The New Digital Economy

When Don Tapscott wrote The Digital Economy in 1994-95, The Digital Age was in its infancy. The pioneering Netscape Web browser 1.0 was in beta, websites didn’t do transactions, we all used dial-up modems, and smartphones didn’t exist. Google, YouTube, Netflix, Facebook, Twitter wouldn’t appear for many years.

Andy Thomas

Yet Tapscott’s analysis – raising issues such as networked business models, the impact of technology on privacy, the inevitable demand for corporate transparency, and the influence of new media on successive generations — deftly captured the many opportunities and challenges that lay in store for society. His pioneering term “digital economy” is now ubiquitous.

What is the status of today’s digital economy? What has actually occurred and where are we headed?

On Thursday February 26, join Tapscott as he reflects on the last 20 years and takes a reality check for the digital age, examining how networked intelligence destroys as it creates. Digital conglomerates like Google lead dozens of industries, doing a better job with a fraction of the employees. Networks like Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb hold the power to wipe out jobs in industries ranging from taxis to hotels. Data frackers like Facebook are acquiring vast treasure troves of data that position them to dominate multiple sectors.

Gain an even deeper understanding of technology’s impact on society at these #SMWNYC events:

Check out the latest lineup of incredible events here.

Get your pass today, and join us and our partners for what will be an extraordinary week of exploring our upwardly mobile, connected world. Grab your pass to get full access to SMWNYC!

Listen To StartUp, A Podcast About Starting A Podcast Startup

Alex Blumberg in real life sounds just like Alex Blumberg on the radio.

If you’ve ever listened to This American Life, the massively popular weekly radio show, or Planet Money, NPR’s excellent economy-explaining podcast, you know Alex Blumberg’s voice. I certainly did. Today, as he stands in front of the laptop he’s perched on a wooden chair atop a long table (a brilliant hack of a standing desk), it’s hard not to close my eyes and just listen.

That is, of course, exactly what Blumberg is hoping for. As reported on The Verge, in the brand-new offices of Gimlet Media, on the fifth floor of a downtown Brooklyn co-working building, amid piles of old furniture and terrifying art, Blumberg and his colleagues are attempting to build a big business out of podcasts. They’ve been chronicling their adventures in — what else? — a podcast, called StartUp. It offers an intimate, funny, and occasionally deeply awkward look at what it takes to start a company. The podcast quickly became popular, and so did Gimlet: Blumberg and his co-founder Matt Lieber raised $1.5 million in venture capital, hired a team, and honed their pitch. That pitch, in a nutshell: we’re entering a golden age of audio, the first since we all sat around radio cabinets and listened to The War of the Worlds. The future of radio is here.

PODCASTS ARE A DECADE OLD, BUT THEY’RE JUST STARTING TO MAKE NOISE

Podcasts aren’t new, of course. Even the term has been around for a decade or so, and now feels hilariously dated. (What is a pod anymore? Or, for that matter, a cast?) They have traditionally been thought of as two people sitting at a table with microphones, chatting aimlessly about… whatever. ESPN, for one, has built a huge podcast network on the shoulders of Bill Simmons chatting with his friends on The BS Report and its many other shows focused deeply on a single topic or a single host. Yet Gimlet Media and others are betting that there’s room for more. More production, more storytelling, more narrative. So far, it seems like they’re right.

Podcast app screenshot

Hi my name is David and I am addicted to podcasts

Serial, the remarkable murder mystery told by Sarah Koenig (another This American Lifealum), is the fastest-growing podcast in history. It’s spawned discussion boards, truthers, deniers, other podcasts, and a level of fanaticism rarely seen this side of Lost.Radiotopia, a new network of shows anchored by the popular 99% Invisible, raised more than $600,000 on Kickstarter in an effort to create essentially an indie label for podcasters. The audience is growing larger and more dedicated, spending hours per day listening to shows about everything from fantasy football to terraforming.

As the shows and audience expand, the technology and infrastructure for podcasts is picking up as well. iTunes remains the behemoth of the podcasting industry, the place where most people find things to listen to. Apple now bakes a podcast app — and a decent one at that — into the iPhone, which has gone a long way toward making people aware of the fact that podcasts even exist in the first place. There are other great apps, too, like Overcast and Pocket Casts.

Top Shelf podcasts

Jake Shapiro, CEO of PRX and Radiotopia

TuneIn and Deezer have both made commitments to podcasts, placing them among their more traditional radio offerings. Spotify, Pandora, and others are rumored to be doing the same. SoundCloud has done wonders for the podcast industry; more than one person told me that uploading and sharing audio online was an awful experience before SoundCloud made something universally embeddable. Apple’s CarPlay and Google’s Android Auto are poised to finally teach us how to connect our phones to our cars, meaning the hours a day we spend driving can be spent listening to what we want, not aimlessly scanning through FM frequencies.

LISTENING TO PODCASTS IS FINALLY AS EASY AS IT SHOULD BE

The opportunity for audio, at least according to Alex Blumberg, is huge. There’s far more room for audio in our lives than even video; we can listen to podcasts while we do dishes, mow the lawn, ride the subway, even while we work. The tech is there, in our pockets. All we need now is something to listen to.

So Blumberg clears his throat and starts talking. He reads his part of the script he’s written, then hits space on his computer and plays audio. Sometimes it’s Blumberg’s wife who begins to talk, other times it’s Matt Lieber, who sits in the room taking notes while his voice comes from Blumberg’s laptop. Blumberg soon stops the audio and speaks again, occasionally stopping and typing, editing his script on the fly. He apologizes every time he stumbles in his reading, which isn’t often. He says things like “establishing sound here that I haven’t pulled yet,” and sneaks bites of his lunch while others’ sound bites play.

Top Shelf podcasts

After 20 minutes or so, he’s gone through a rough cut of episode seven of StartUp, which the whole of Gimlet Media is nervous about. In it, Blumberg asks listeners for money. Money to make up the last $200,000 of the $1.5 million. He’s offering a few lucky listeners a stake in the company, while warning them of the risks and the many, many regulatory hurdles to investing. (After the episode aired, Gimlet raised the money in less than an hour.) He finishes reading, makes a face at his team, and says, “Well, there you go.” Everyone else furiously shares their Google docs with each other, and edits begin.

Making a podcast, even one about making a podcast, is hard work. But more than ever before, this is the right time to try. Podcasts won’t kill AM and FM as we know it, at least not anytime soon, but they’re on the precipice of becoming totally and utterly mainstream. They offer what we want, when we want, wherever we want. They’re our own personalized radio, with every topic, every show, and every host you love on exactly your own schedule.

Everything podcasts were named for might now be dead, but podcasts are just starting to come alive. The future of radio is here, and it’s awesome.

4 Lessons from The Dark Side of Social Media

Community Managers from brands, agencies, professional organizations and more meetup periodically in New York City to network IRL and benefit from one another’s experiences—the good and bad. It’s a great way to share new knowledge and bond over common experiences.

This week, the #CMmeetup group gathered for a panel discussion on The Dark Side of Social Media. And here are the takeaways:

  1. “Leverage your personal social capital only for your own creations.”
    You may be the author of the latest viral social campaign. And of course, you work with a brand you believe in. “That doesn’t mean you should invest personal social capital to ensure the campaign’s success,” says Savannah Peterson, Global Community Manager at Shapeways, the 3D printing marketplace.
  2. “Be open and honest about why you can’t be open and honest.”
    When matters of privacy and legal concerns restrict how much a brand can share with fans and followers, share that fact with them instead. Honesty is really the best policy. “Be sincere, and also let them know what steps your team is taking to correct the concern or improve service,” advises Morgan Johnston, Corporate Communications Manager and Social Strategist for JetBlue Airways.
  3. “Have fun with harmless mockery.”
    Every brand gets made fun of; learn to roll with it. “When no one gets hurt and the teasing is in good fun, it can be a chance to show that the brand has a sense of humor and to engage in a bit of frivolity,” says Jeff Ramos, Community Manager with MKG.
  4. “Behind every tool is a person.”
    “Egregious mistakes cannot justifiably be attributed to a glitch or a platform error. People create and post content,” confirms Evan Watkins, Community Manager at MRY. The upshot: take time to make good choices because, in the end, you’re personally responsible.

Wish you’d been there to learn from the pros? Here’s a video of the lively panel discussion!

Featured image courtesy MKG.

4 Social Media Love Stories

Finding love on the Internet is nothing new — one in 10 Americans have tried online dating, and one-third of U.S. married couples met online.

But professing it in a creative way? You know, not just the “OMG! I have THE BEST boyfriend/husband/wife/girlfriend ever!!!! I love him/her so much!!!” status updates? Now, that’s a little less common.

What about finding it online in a different way? We’ve all heard of online dating, but some folks are dating online without the help of a site tailored to that purpose.

To give you a break from the Facebook doting and Match.com love stories, I’ve surfed the ‘net to bring some truly awe-worthy social media love stories in honor of Valentine’s Day:

  1. “I Hope This Gets To You” viral video
    Now if this isn’t the best example of a profession of love and social media, I don’t know what is.

    Back in November 2010 (eek! Doesn’t this seem like eons ago!?), L.A. director and editor Walter C. May got his roommates — a band called The Daylights — together to write and record a song for his girlfriend who’d just moved away to attend Duke University. He then filmed a music video, spending only $100 on materials.

    The catch? None of his friends or her friends were allowed to tell her about it. May’s girlfriend was to discover the video on her own, through social media sharing alone.

    It took his girlfriend less than a week to see the video. And apparently she loved it.

  2. The classic Facebook search of your own name
    OK, who hasn’t looked up their own name on Facebook to see who else shares the name? I did — there’s a woman in DC with my name. We’re now Facebook friends.

    But a Florida woman has a much more interesting story.

    One day, a bored Kelly Hildebrandt searched her own name on the social networking site. To her surprise there was a man who shared the name — so she sent him a message. Apparently, he thought she was pretty cute. They were engaged several months later.

    Unfortunately, this couple only stayed married for three years.

  3. Using Twitter hashtags
    Laurie Davis is the author of the book Love At First Click: The Ultimate Guide to Dating Online and founder of eFlirt expert. Basically, she helps people find love online through dating sites — and regular social media sites, too. She actually met her own fiancé through Twitter.

    Her fiancé, Thomas Edwards, is also a dating coach. She searched the hashtag #dating, saw one of his tweets, retweeted him, met up for drinks and the rest is history.

    The couple plans to wed this May.

    Fun fact: For all you hopefuls when it comes to finding love on Twitter, a U.K. electronics company found via research that it takes an average of 225 tweets to successfully pick up a person.

  4. Brought together by music — and social media
    One of my friends who avidly dates via OKCupid once said to me “when you meet guys at a bar, all you have in common with them is that you were at the same bar. But that’s not so with online dating.”

    The story of Dianna Hank and Noah Zitsman reminds me of what my friend said.

    The two met in a Phish chat room on Turntable.fm. After being friendly with each other for a while, they realized they both were attending the same Phish concert in Vermont — why not meet up?

    Meet up they did. And they did at other concerts after that. Eventually, they ended up dating.

Lane Blackmer is a self-employed former journalist. Although she’s no longer a newsie, Lane since discovered other uses for social media such as public relations, marketing, job searching, and trying to win gift cards from her favorite local businesses through contests. Lane inhabits Philadelphia, where’s it’s not always sunny…but at least there’s cheese steaks. You can follow her on Twitter at @LaneBlackmer.

Privacy and Publicity in Social Media: It’s Complicated!

Moving life onto the web has only added new platforms for life’s complexities to manifest themselves, each platform with its own language and nuances. Facebook documents our lives and immortalizes our words and photographs (often to our future regret), juxtaposing digital permanence with human temporality. This creates new questions, like what to do with the profile of friends who have died or whether we should “defriend” exes?

We craft identities for ourselves using Facebook from the “stories” we allow to live on our walls and the information we share publicly. It often feels that people no longer value privacy when we read posts that can only be described by the acronym TMI.

danah boyd, Senior Researcher at Microsoft and ethnographer of the internet, researches publicity and privacy online, especially in teens. danah’s curiosity was piqued, when she read about a teen who was frustrated that her mother was accessing her LiveJournal, though it was publicly available. This teen’s seemingly contradictory frustration makes much more sense through danah’s definition of privacy as having control over a situation and how it will be interpreted.

In-person conversations are by default, private, and require effort to be made public. Online interactions are the opposite. All interactions are recorded permanently, publicized, and are typically only made private after being posted. With this definition of privacy as control, teens are fiercely private, but often lack the agency to publicize and privatize material as they choose. They want to participate in the public space, but in ways that they can control and manage. It can often be easier to condemn the behavior of teens than to understand it, but danah’s research illuminates that today’s teens aren’t really behaving much differently than previous generations.

danah is joining us at Social Media Week with Andrew Rasiej, founder of Personal Democracy Forum to share her research on teens and her recent book, It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens. Additionally, she will be discussing public and private space as it relates to big data.

Make sure you don’t miss the chance to hear from danah by getting your pass to SMW NYC here!

Featured image courtesy of personaldemocracy.

#eprdctn – Digital Publishing Professionals Collaborate on Twitter

Creating digital books takes a fair amount of knowhow and patience: ebook developers have CSS and HTML skills, and they put in long hours designing, coding, testing, and running quality assurance checks on each title that they build.

It’s a specialized — and potentially lonely — niche in publishing, not unlike copyediting, in its level of nuance and behind-the-scenes mystique. Some publishers and content creation teams employ a number of developers in-house. But many industry professionals work on teams of experts in related fields or remotely as independent consultants and are, in essence, isolated from their eProduction peers.

Along with that comes the challenge of a swiftly evolving digital publishing world, where there are frequent software updates, numerous tweaks to vendor specifications, and each new device launch means new rules and new creative opportunities for developers.

Hashtag Community

hashtagFortunately social media, and the #eprdctn hashtag, make it possible for eProduction pros to keep up with those changes, stay current, stay connected, and stay sane while working independently. “#eprdctn is a large community of ebook developers who discuss technical aspects of their day-to-day work. We share advice and resources as we find ways of improving workflows,” explains Iris Amelia Febres, an Ebook Developer at F+W Media who also teaches electronic publishing for Emerson College.

#eprdctn is a community that “is most often [engaged in] a loose conversation about current issues. Once in a while we…have a ‘dumb question amnesty,’ during which time anyone can post any question — no matter how simple — to #eprdctn and get an answer from an industry leader. These are always very popular,” notes Laura Brady, Ebook Developer and Principal at Brady Type and an occasional leader of the #eprdctn group.

Flocking To Twitter

In 2011, Lindsay Martin started the group by contacting professional in the field who already used Twitter to share insights and encouraging them to include the hashtag with their posts, explains Ebook Developer Colleen Cunningham (@BookDesignGirl).

A valuable group of established experts, regulars, lurkers and drop-ins, “the #eprdctn community on Twitter is far and away my favourite co-worker. These people lighten my load with humour, tech support, news and information, and collaboration,” says Brady. Beginners are always welcome, according to Febres, who describes the community as both “a job board and a Q&A session.

Twitter makes it all possible. Some people have tried extending the group “to other social media platforms but Twitter seems to work the best because, there, it’s truly organic and of-the-moment. No moderators are necessary,” notes Cunningham. #eprdctn hosts a nicely structured hour-long weekly chat too; a “roundtable discussion, where it’s a bit of a free-for-all in terms of what to talk about. Sometimes major events of the week will form the session [or] guests lead talks and people will ask them questions,” says Febres. You can join the conversation each Wednesday at 11:00 am EST.

In Real Life

#eprdctn comes together in person, too! Febres organizes a casual meet-up of developers as time allows and points out that the community also tries to “get together if we’re attending a conference, like Digital Book World. It’s great to have that face-to-face time to connect with colleagues on a personal level. We trade stories and tips, network, and just have a good time. It’s part networking, part therapy. Making ebooks can be tough!”

Women’s Workforce

The group is doing work, beyond the day-to-day tasks at hand, by empowering women in tech to continue making great strides in the field of eProduction. “Ebook development seems to be a good gender mix, the leaders in the field are also a healthy mix. In fact, there are so many whip-smart women in this tech-focused space that it makes me a hopeful feminist ebook developer. The most outspoken members continue to be men but that is certainly shifting,” says Brady who strives “to mentor women trying to find work in ebooks.” And who, in planning the ebookcraft conference, “managed to get about 60% female speakers.”

Febres agrees that gender parity is important in the world of ebook production: “There’s a pocket of us female developers….we complain and challenge and wonder [and] we can be pretty vocal about it. I always try to share different ‘pro-women in tech’ networking events and resources, like the monthly Boston Girl Geek Dinner.”

You Can Too

As talented women-in-tech in their own right, Febres and Brady share a few suggestions about how you can launch your own social media lab-style community:

  1. Pick a day and time.
  2. Be consistent with your meetings.
  3. Posit questions to the group and share links.
  4. Invite others to participate.
  5. Have a hashtag!

Regularly scheduled chats can quickly turn into an anytime resource network. “Think of building a community as a collaborative tool, not a community with leaders and followers… #eprdctn is not a place to say and tell. It is where you go to figure out, to help, to ask for [help] and to find fellow travellers,” advises Brady.

Does your industry host useful social media conversations? Share your wisdom and community hashtags in the comments. Then, make sure you check out these related events this SMW14!


Deanna Utroske is the Social Media Brand Director for New York Women in Communications and writes on women’s career issues, lifestyle topics and more. Follow her on Twitter @DeannaUtroske.

Storytelling and Journalism in the Digital Age: 5 Events You Need at SMW NYC

Digital media’s searchability, sharability and speed are changing the way that we interact with news. Join the conversation as we look at what this means for journalists, marketers and the stories we share!

  1. The Art & Science of Storytelling
    Even as we change the ways in which we consume and share content- some things don’t change. The need to tell a compelling story is here to stay. EVP of Advertising at the NYTimes, Meredith Kopit Levien, will dive into new platforms for creating value and sharing engaging content to help you master the art of storytelling for yourself.
  2. Is Social Killing Storytelling?
    Well is it? If you are feeling cramped by your character limit or the attention span of your readers, this panel hosted by AOL is here to help. Explore what social media means for storytellers and the ways that social media can be leveraged to share long-form content (because not everything can be said in a tweet).
  3. Calling All Journalists: How to Rebrand Yourself as a Content Marketing & Social Expert
    Just because there might be fewer opportunities for writers in traditional print media roles, does not mean that there are fewer total opportunities. This panel of seasoned professionals will help you polish your resume, master the vocab and connect with the wealth of opportunities for journalists to partner with brands in creating content that connects with readers and customers.
  4. Investigative Reporting for the Web: Is Anything Different?
    Investigative journalism plays a pivotal role in society, exposing exploitation and injustices happening right under our noses. However, in the age of the Internet, opinions abound and facts can be scarce. Pioneers in the field from BuzzFeed, Propublic, Rueters and the Washington Post will discuss the facts and the role the web plays in the Rennaissance of investigative reporting.
  5. The Changing Face of News Consumption, Hosted by WSJ
    Wondering what skills today’s journalists, reporters and editors need to have to succeed in the new mobile news economy? Or which demographic is driving the changes and trends in news delivery? This event hosted by the WSJ will answer these questions and more, introducing you to innovators in the field including, Neal Mann of the WSJ, Anthony de Rosa of Circa and Jim Roberts of Mashable.

Storytelling and journalism are important themes at SMW14, February 18 to 21, but don’t forget about the wealth of other engaging topics, like marketing, health & wellness and entrepreneurship! And did we mention the parties?

Registration is open! Check out the schedule, then get your pass today here, and join us and our partners, Nokia and MKG, for what will be a great week of exploring our always on, always connected world.

The Present and Future State of Media, Featured at SMW NYC

Many have touted 2013 as the year that changed publishing and media. From listicles taking over our news feeds to the growing dominance of native advertising to Upworthy’s staggering growth numbers (which have outpaced even that of the New York Times), last year we witnessed a seismic shift in the industry.

We’re diving deep into these at SMW NYC, and you’ll be able to know what lays in store for media in 2014 with event like these:

Distribution is Key

Few companies have scaled quite the way BuzzFeed has, especially with its range. It truly is the epitome of a digitally native brand and a perfect case study, which is why we’re bringing in CEO and Founder, Jonah Peretti for a conversation on original and branded content, data analytics, mobile apps, and which social platforms are most important for BuzzFeed’s model.

Later in the week, BuzzFeed will be sharing specifically on how they have emerged as king of content distribution. Social is the new starting point for how we discover, consume and share content. But good content doesn’t necessarily mean it’ll go viral. So, Jonathan Perelman, VP of Agency Strategy and Industry Development at BuzzFeed, joins us to explain how content and distribution can work successfully together. If your brand is engaging in content marketing on any level, this conversation is one you can’t miss.

Harness the Power of Social

If it’s not BuzzFeed clogging up your newsfeed, then you’re seeing the world’s fastest growing media brand, Upworthy. Upworthy curates meaningful content on social, economic and societal issues that is then massively shared by the site’s community. Upworthy.com routinely breaks its own traffic records and has more views than the New York Times, FOX News or BleacherReport — meaning, Founder and CEO, Eli Pariser, knows how to harness the power of social media. He’ll be on hand at SMW NYC to share his secret sauce and where Upworthy as a media entity is heading.

Get Mobile

Nearly 1 in 10 U.S. Adults now get their news on Twitter, with 85% of those consuming it on a mobile device. This means media organizations are more than ever needing to address this change. So, we’re featuring a debate between publishing industry leaders and an interactive audience discussion centered on the future of digital, mobile, and social platforms for news organizations. At the end of this event, we’ll all have an understanding of how outlets can make the most of mobile and social platforms and what journalists and editors need to know.

Overall, we’ll be presenting a solid look at the present state and future of media, along with a focus on leaders you can look to. All we need is you.

Get your pass today here and join us for a serious look at media.

Stealing The Show: Jonah Peretti on The Colbert Report

We know BuzzFeed’s Jonah Peretti has a few things to share about the future of journalism. So, when he took the stage with Stephen Colbert last night, we were thrilled to see what came out. Colbert brings his normal satire, grilling Jonah about sexy pandas, Syria, listicles, and click bait.

It’s a great 6-minute interview that will get you ready for Jonah taking the stage with us in February. Watch it below, and share what you want to hear Jonah share this SMW14! In the words of Colbert, “go click on it.”

5 Minutes With Deanna Zandt


Deanna Zandt is a media technologist, the author of Share This! How You Will Change the World with Social Networking, the creator of a killer TEDxBerlin talk and an all-around bad ass. Chatting with her is always fun and informative — plus, we got hearing Samuel L. Jackson singing Taylor Swift out of it…  She’s emceeing Day 2 of Ideas Connected at Global HQ, so swing by and see her in person. In the meantime, read on!

1. What is your or your organization’s greatest success with social media to date?
In early 2012, the Susan G Komen Foundation decided to no longer fund Planned Parenthood’s breast cancer initiatives. Outrage erupted, and while many advocates were focused specifically on the funding and financial issues, I wanted to focus on stories. I thought about the women who didn’t have money with which to speak their minds by donating or taking away donations; these were the women who would be most affected by Komen’s decision, and lose access to low-cost and free breast cancer screenings.

I created a Tumblr blog called Planned Parenthood Saved Me, where I asked people to submit stories of how Planned Parenthood had changed their lives. It caught fire; in 4 days, 300 stories were collected and shared, and mainstream media outlets like Rachel Maddow and the New York Times were referencing posts and sharing excerpts. But the real story lay inside the social numbers: More than half the traffic — 29,000 unique visits in 4 days — came from social media, and before any major media mention. The fire came from us sharing our stories with one another.

2. What do you think is the most exciting thing happening in the emerging technology and/or new media space right now?
The tension, and possibly an erupting battle, for the open web and web standards is pretty exciting. We see increasingly bolder moves towards silo-ed information and walled gardens, and that’s just not sustainable. The web yearns to be free, and I feel that we’re on the cusp of those starting to break down. Remember when AOL was the end-all-be-all Internet service? And how that model fell apart as both users and technologies became more sophisticated? This, too, will come to pass with the social web.

3. What speaker or event are you most looking forward to at SMW NYC?
I probably sound like a lush, but honestly, the parties are always fantastic during SMW NYC. Not just for going-out-fun-value, but for connecting and reconnecting with good people. I’m looking forward to spending offline time with my communities!

4. What do you think is SMW’s greatest value add to the tech/media space?
I’ve loved SWM’s ethos with regards to wanting to make the world a better place, and I welcomed the opportunity to bring the networks that I’m a part of– social, gender and racial justice communities– to the table to help shape the content. Those voices are often missing in the technology and media spaces, and I’m thrilled that SMW wants to dig deeper there.

5. What is the most creative way you’ve seen social media used?
Honestly, anything with a little bit of humor generally gets my attention– to be funny on social media, you really have to have an extraordinary combination of skills: timing, wit, writing, some tech savvy, etc. From the old meme games we used to play on Twitter (I’ll never forget #unseenprequels and #SamJacksonSlowJams [NSFW]), to fake accounts and image macros (the Willy Wonka series almost never fails to deliver), to the White House responding to the Death Star petition… yeah. It’s a nice reminder that we’re all human and can poke at each other a little bit.

Deanna Zandt is a media technologist and the author of Share This! How You Will Change the World with Social Networking (Berrett-Koehler, June 2010). She is a consultant to key progressive media and advocacy organizations, and her clients have included The Ford Foundation, The Daily Beast/Newsweek, and Jim Hightower’s Hightower Lowdown. She is contributor to Forbes.com via her ForbesWoman “Prospect: Tech” blog, and a social media advice contributor NPR’s flagship news program, “All Things Considered.” Zandt specializes in social media, is a leading expert in women and technology, and is a frequent guest on CNN International, BBC Radio, Fox News and more.She works with groups to create and implement effective web strategies toward organizational goals of civic engagement and cultural agency, and uses her background in linguistics, advertising, telecommunications and finance to complement her technical expertise. She has spoken at a number of conferences, including TEDxBerlin, SXSW Interactive, Personal Democracy Forum,  Netroots Nation, the National Conference on Media Reform, Facing Race, Web 2.0 Expo, Bioneers, America’s Future Now (formerly “Take Back America”), Women Action & The Media, and provides beginner and advanced workshops both online and in person.

Surveying the Visual Social Media Landscape

As you might have read on Mashable, this Getty stock photo was widely circulated through social media in the wake of hurricane Sandy and purported to be a shot of the storm approaching New York, an example of one problem discussed during Tuesday’s Social Media Week panel.

Tuesday’s “The Rise of Visual Social Media” panel, moderated by Rubina Madan Fillion (Social Media Editor, The Wall Street Journal), featuring Sean Mann (Social Media Editor, The Wall Street Journal), Sion Fullana (Freelance Photographer), Liz Eswein (Co-Founder, The Mobile Media Lab), and Brian DiFeo (Co-Founder, The Mobile Media Lab) honed in on various aspects of the current state of visual social media, remaining largely within the Instagram realm.

In the culture that procrastinates by staring at posts of aggregated pictures of everything from puppies to family portraits, complacency may characterize our relationship with visual social media. Images are simply captured, consumed, and cast aside across a multitude of social media platforms. We are a community of SnapChat-like consumers. Do you actually remember what your friend’s wedding dress looked like from the photos you looked through for 20 minutes on Facebook? Didn’t think so.

Most of the panelists of Tuesday’s talk at 92Y Tribeca seem, like most of us, to take an observational role in the landscape of visual social media. Rather than discuss where technology is taking us and the cultural implications of these changes, whether they manifest themselves in the way we communicate with each other, frame our understanding of the world, or maintain (or don’t) our culture in an increasingly globalized world, the discussion almost exclusively orbited Instagram, “photoshopped” images, and how to take a good mobile photo.

Questions of practical issues were also discussed among the panelists, such as what should be done about any entity that republishes an image without attribution or credit, a very real concern in today’s world of unlimited content. Mann attempted to push the discussion to a wider vantage point by patiently cutting to the center of each question with targeted observations and commentary. Glimpses of deeper conversation were seen, but not explored in depth.

Despite this, each panelist pulled from their varying professional experiences to weave together a lively discussion. Mann assured audience members that news agencies have checks and balances, namely jigsaw replication (piecing together a scene of an event by looking at images taken from various angles by different people present), in place to avoid printing or publishing fraudulent images, while Fullana urged caution, citing a prominent Spanish publication that paid 30,000 Euro for an adulterated photograph. DiFeo and Eswein, with their extensive knowledge of Instagram, weighed in on the omnipresence and ease of photo-altering apps. According to Eswein, the presence of filters on mobile phone cameras is “just an evolution of how filters have been enabled previously” and offers the ability to bring out nuances of a photo. DiFeo assured listeners that a photo filtered the wrong way would jump out at them.

One such moment occurred when the panelists discussed newcomer to the visual social media scene, Vine, a platform for creating six-second videos and what they see as the limitations of this new format. Fullana cites our decreasing attention spans as a major obstacle to Vine’s success in the news industry, claiming no one would invest six seconds in a video when they could instantaneously gauge their interest in a story from their reaction to a photo. Fullana’s claim seems akin to promoting a movie through posters rather than trailers and, therefore, rather shortsighted. The panel seemed to unanimously agree that Vine contextually doesn’t work for news coverage because Vine videos are planned and edited rather than shot in the moment. But what if Vine-like videos, produced through this app or another technology, could prove to be the movie trailers of feature news stories Couldn’t they be more attractive than a correspondent or anchor’s one sentence pitch?  I wish, instead, they had discussed what it means for modern-day reporting if a package of six seconds or 140 characters is seen as too much content.

Maybe no one knows what advancements in visual social media mean for an array of visual industries, but Social Media Week is the best time to contemplate that horizon. Conjecture may be all we have at this point, but that’s where the exciting ideas and innovations happen. If the talk had dabbled more in the unknown, everyone’s passion for visual social media would have been more fulfilled.

Linnea Zielinski is a freelance project assistant and intern at Serious Eats and a grad student studying publishing at NYU SCPS.

Top image courtesy of istwitterwrong
“Rise of visual social media explained in a pic of the audience – almost all on their mobile phones #smwvisual” Photo and Tweet by Sean Mann (@fieldproducer)