The Cost Effective, Scalable, Repeatable Way to Reach New Customers

“Content is the easiest and most scalable way for someone to exchange value for time.”

Eddie Kim, the Cofounder and CEO of SimpleReach, helps publishers, agencies and brands understand what content is resonating with customers and how to distribute it most effectively. In his company’s analytics, he has seen countless times that the best way to bring clients to a potential customer is using content.

Forbes utilizes an “always-on” model that allows marketers to publish unlimited content as they see fit. This approach, referred to as native advertising and content marketing, creates an audience by building a body of work online. The arena is growing, with an estimated $60 billion to be spent on native advertising in 2016, according to Forbes VP of Ad Products and Strategy Ann Marinovich.

The strategy differs from traditional advertising, and the industry has seen a growing need for measurement and transparency on how native programs are performing. Conversations are increasingly focused on understanding what exactly a product is delivering, and data and analytics is key to that story.

Traackr is an influencer management system that helps brands and agencies curate relationships in online media and has recently partnered with Forbes. Pierre-Loïc Assayag, Traackr’s CEO, has observed a clear change in the content of the message itself.

“Brands have shifted from pushing a specific product on customers, to having a conversation about brand purpose,” he explained.

Read the full session recap at SMW News

Secure your spot in February of 2017 to join 2,000+ leaders in media, entertainment, and technology for a week of inspiring and educational events learning.

The Difference Between Facebook and Google for Data Marketers

In an attempt to figure out how we can do more to change the world, Social Media Week brought five leading thinkers in the data and analytics field to discuss some of the big questions surrounding data’s impact on social change.

Brian Reich, Director, Hive/USA for UNHCR, led a session on why we aren’t doing more with data analytics and science to discover solutions for social good, and what some of the barriers are to doing this.

Panelists included Christine Campigotto (Social Sector Lead, Civis Analytics), Matthew Daniels (Creator, Polygraph), Ari Wallach (CEO, FastCompany Futures), and Mike Williams (Research engineer, Fast Forward Labs).

“Can we solve the world’s more complex problems with big data?” Ari Wallach sums the answer up saying, “desire is there, but the ability to access it across platforms is not there.” Another valid point was voiced from Mike Williams, adding that part of the problem therein lies in getting the human capital (the data scientists) to the table, since the money is elsewhere.

This poses a strong argument that was echoed by others throughout the talk, this idea of getting the best people, those at the top of their fields, to do the right thing with their skills. While this may be a valid reason as to what’s stoping us from solving the big problems, it illuminates an important idea about the altruistic nature of each of us.

Christine Camigotto spoke to this bigger philosophical component of the question, “The unit of measure is a human, and we know that humans don’t always behave rationally.”

If we all assume that someone else will do it, what happens when no one does? There’s no allusion of the truth here, most of us are out for ourselves, but if none of us are mining the solutions to social issues and creating social good for us collectively, who will? How can we change the world if we don’t help?

Data allows us to capture valuable insights, mine and measure information that can aid in changing the entire landscape of a business or cause. The power of data is not lost on any of us who work with social media or with data science.

Read the full session recap at SMW News

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Data Marketing Masterclass: How to Create Customer Lifetime Value [WATCH]

Customer Lifetime Value (LTV) is the idea of zooming out and building a wider view of your customers. Too often are marketers more interested in new clicks, conversions, and users, rather than focus on the importance of maintaining current customers, and optimizing their engagement with a product, service, or brand.

In the video below from our Facebook Live masterclass, hear from Joshua Neckes (President, Simon Data) where he explains the value of getting your data organized in one place to allow you to measure, experiment and optimize the LTV of consumers and their experience at all touch points.

Secure your spot in February of 2017 to join 2,000+ leaders in media, entertainment, and technology for a week of inspiring and educational events learning.

Better Understand Your Audience with Simple Lessons in A/B Testing

Traditionally marketing and advertising practices have relied largely upon gut-something to the nature of look and feel. As social media has reared its newborn head, incumbent celebrities and corporate heads have gradually begun to tiptoe towards actually building a following for brand and personal purposes.

With the new rise of data and low-cost scalability in computing, the inception of revolutionary metrics and statistics are making us question our gut. For instance, Betsy Fast, Site Director at Seventeen.com, recounted how her suggested titles for a teenager’s article was actually not as popular as the original title, due to the data she received from her site.

On the whole, viewership is exploding due to social platforms: 25 million views from Harpers Bazaar’s Facebook page with only 2.5 million actual followers is unheard of a decade ago. Viewership means voices, and those voices are being aggregated and analyzed.

Disruption is salient. Joyann King, editor of HarpersBazaar.com, mentioned that their site just implemented A/B testing, which would resolve numerous site design and outreach choices through actual quantification of visitor behavior.

Humorously so, she reflected that the choice of a site main product image used to be “holding hands and saying ‘I feel M&M’s’ or ‘I feel Reese’s’,” which is as far a cry from leveraging site analytics as is using ouija board to ask about your ancestors versus signing up for Ancestry.com.

Suffice it to say, this step toward data-driven decision-making in the media industry is a mile long leap for the marketing industry.

Read the full session recap at SMW News

Secure your spot in February of 2017 to join 2,000+ leaders in media, entertainment, and technology for a week of inspiring and educational events learning.

Millennials Check Their Phones More Than 157 Times Per Day

At this morning’s first SMWNYC session at the TimesCenter, we heard from Michelle Klein, Head of Marketing for North America at Facebook. Michelle began her presentation emphasizing all of the technology at we possess at our fingertips, calling us almost superhuman.

She then presented us with some figures from today’s digital age: the average adult checks their phone 30 times a day, and the average millennial checks their phone more than 150 times a day.

What exists in our lives is a “sensory experience of communication that helps us to connect with others, without having to look away,” as Michelle explained. This is great for marketers, like herself. It gives them a million ways to connect with audiences.

Next, Michelle discussed how to use technology to benefit people and create the best communication. As she said, the best technologies include: “something that makes things better, connects people through storytelling, is immediate, expressive and immersive, and adapts and changes.” Michelle spoke about the apps she uses on a day-to-day basis, which make her life easier and better.

In terms of storytelling, Facebook enables people to share and connect, through viewing the narratives of each of their friends’ lives. She then mentioned how 6 out of the 10 most downloaded apps in the world right now are messaging apps.

These messaging apps, like Facebook Messenger “are real time, and now” technologies. Michelle then discussed the “expressive”, illustrating how images help us navigate the world and tell stories in a simple and fast way.

Read the full session recap at SMW News

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To Find Success on Snapchat, You Must Think of Your Audience First

We heard from a panel of four Snapchat experts, who discussed the “Best Brands on Snapchat.”

The panel included Sarah Epler (Senior Director of Social Media and Fan Engagement at MTV), Bridget Evans (Account Director at VaynerMedia), Aaron Wolfe (Social Media Specialist at American Airlines), Carla Zanoni (Executive Emerging Media Editor at The Wall Street Journal), and Jeremy Skule (Chief Marketing Officer at Nasdaq) was the moderator.

Jeremy began the panel by presenting the audience with some figures: Snapchat has about 100 million active users, there are about 400 million snaps taken every day, and it was the fastest growing social media platform of 2014. “It’s an important platform, and an emerging one,” said Jeremy. Each member of the panel emphasized Snapchat’s emergence as a story-telling platform.

Regarding their audience, Carla said that, “I think it’s a misunderstanding that young people aren’t interested in business and marketing. We’ve been happy to see an entrepreneurial and aspirational audience is interested in engaging with The Wall Street Journal.”

Also talking about engagement, Sarah, noted how MTV’s Snapchat audience will often call them out on other social media sites if their content feels too branded.

The panel then spoke about what it’s like managing a corporate brand on Snapchat. Aaron mentioned how “We like to think about putting out content that your friends would want to see. Are they going to want to see the big corporate, this is where we are sort of thing? Or are they going to want to see us in a city, actually enjoying that city?”

Read the full session recap at SMW News

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How The New York Times Measures User Engagement

“Our business model, essentially, is that we produce high quality journalism.”

At Social Media Week in New York, we heard from Mark Thompson, the CEO of the New York Times in a discussion with Toby Daniels, the Founder and Executive Director of SMW. Mark began his talk by telling us about his background, and his start in TV journalism with the BBC.

Even while working at the BBC, Mark acknowledged that The New York Times was “one of the very best newsrooms on the planet.” He noticed that The New York Times confronted the digital change the world saw with a different view than other American news outlets.

According to Mark, The New York Times “continued to produce great journalism. They doubled down on their investment in content, which was the better play.”

Next, Mark spoke about the strategy at The New York Times. He, and The New York Times, have realized that people are willing to pay for high quality content. In terms of user experience, he believes that every subscriber should feel like the content they receive is worth paying for, even if it’s free.

He believes that smartphones, in particular, enable companies with high quality to find deeply engaged users. In order to do this, “you need to become a destination, you need to start becoming a daily habit”.

“We stand for storytelling, and for arming people to begin a conversation – whether it be physical or on social media,” Mark said.

Read the full session recap at SMW News

Secure your spot in February of 2017 to join 2,000+ leaders in media, entertainment, and technology for a week of inspiring and educational events learning.