Hearst’s Lessons at #SMWNYC on Using Data and Gut to Build Social Audiences

Kate Lewis, SVP and Editorial Director at Hearst Magazines Digital Media (HMDM), will moderate a session with three Hearst Digital site editors to explore how audiences of large scales can successfully build and cater towards their social presence.

They will compare the effectiveness of two different social strategies: the use of performance metrics and audience data to inform social content, and following one’s gut instinct to create content that resonates with a community.

The Hearst brands represented on the panel have experienced the largest social audience increases during 2015, and session takeaways and will include: 1) the significance of insight teams, 2) the importance of humans analyzing data, and 3) how to communicate with your audience as if it’s a group of like-minded individuals.

Data vs. Gut” will take place on Tuesday, February 23rd at 3:00pm at the TimesCenter (FWD Stage), and participating editors on this session include:

  • Joyann King of HarpersBazaar
  • Joanna Saltz of Delish
  • Betsy Fast of Seventeen


★ Join thousands of industry leaders at SMW New York ★


View The Initial Program Of Events for SMW New York

Social Media Week New York, now in it’s 8th year, brings together thousands of professionals in marketing, media and technology. We’re excited to announce the initial schedule and speaker lineup for SMW New York, which takes place this February 22-26.

Join us across our two official venues, and hear from organizations such as Ogilvy, Starcom MediaVest, MRY, Forbes, Mashable, MTV, The Economist, GE, Pinterest, Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, Spotify and many more!

Register for SMW New York

If you’d like to hear from visionary speakers, and join the thousands of attendees that come to Social Media Week in New York each year, register today by purchasing your pass.

Image Credit: Latino Weekly

The Conscientious Teen’s Guide to Using the Internet for Good

This post is a series of blogs contributed by SMW NYC media partner Differences Magazine. To learn more about Differences Magazine and to see the original post by Jessica Bender, please click here

There’s no doubt about it; the typical American teenager is obsessed with the Internet. According to a 2011 study conducted by the Pew Research Center, the vast majority of teenagers ages 12 to 17 (a whopping 95 percent) are now online. Most teens are addicted to watching epic feats of kitten talents on YouTube or reading up on old-school Nickelodeon cartoons on Wikipedia, but a lot don’t know that they can use their Internet skills to do good.

With the exponential growth of teenage social responsibility and activism over the past few years, the apathetic teen is slowly becoming extinct. Heck, you even have a better shot of getting into the college of your dreams if you even volunteer (according to a survey conducted by teen-centric non-profit DoSomething.org)! Want to get in on the do-gooder action? We know the best places for you to get inspired and get started on your quest to become a young social activist.

If you’re attached to your cell phone…you can get inspiration on ways to volunteer to your mobile! DoSomething.org sends out weekly volunteering ideas once a week to over 35,000 teens, so you have the power to make a difference right in your text inbox! Sign up by texting “DoSomething” to 30644 or registering your cell number here.

For the YouTube addicts…make your voice heard with your webcam. When it comes to important social issues, an audience will always exist. While you’re recording, make sure to keep it short, simple, and fun! Check out crowd-source initiatives like the It Gets Better Project and We Stop Hate to get you started on your quest to become a socially responsibly YouTube sensation.

It’s okay if you overshare on your social networks…if you’re sharing the right content. Instead of updating your statuses with tales of unrequited love, try to share stories and content on Facebook, Google+ or LinkedIn about issues you truly care about. Your followers will thank you for the breath of fresh air on their feeds.

Glued to your Tumblr dashboard? There’s tons of non-profits and charities that post and reblog mega-cool content revolving around social good and making a difference. Their inspiration and feel-good posts will also probably make your heart grow a few sizes bigger, so it’s probably a good idea to follow what they’re doing. Some of my fave non-profits that are invading Tumblr include The Trevor Project, To Write Love on Her Arms, She’s the First, and UNICEF.

Can’t stop Tweeting? Use your Twitter account as a platform to promote issues and causes you’re passionate about in 140 characters or less. Three things to keep in mind while being a thoughtful Tweetheart:

1. Hashtag keywords when Tweeting so your Tweets show up easier in searches.

2. When Tweeting an article you want to share, make sure to refer back to the source’s Twitter handle. They’ll appreciate you taking notice of their content and might follow you back as a result.

3. Don’t Tweet or retweet too much – that’ll drive your followers absolutely crazy.

That being said, there’s a plethora of organizations and social good sites just aching for more followers. Mashable and GOOD have lists of organizations for you to follow and worship.

A Student’s Perspective: State Your Case: Research vs. Social Analytics

Ashley Mayo is a student at Columbia’s School of Journalism. She is one of ten students providing on the ground coverage of SMWNYC- all from the student’s perspective. Ashley is providing coverage of State Your Case: Research vs. Social Analytics, sponsored by ORC International.

“You shouldn’t still be having conversations about social ROI,” said Craig Hepburn, Global Director of Social Media for Nokia. “Since having conversations with people is such an important part of your business, how could you not be doing it?”

If 2011 was about convincing companies that social media is an essential tool, 2012 is about discovering ways to track it success. Are raw analytics more valuable than sentiment? Or is sentiment the most important metric? In an intriguing debate on Monday, four executives who manage the social growth of their companies addressed these very questions.

“Our approach is among the most pragmatic,” said Jeffrey Bodzewski, Director of Social Marketing at Aspen Marketing Services. “Our clients are on the direct marketing side and they value data. We’ve been pushing to truly monetize the social experience.”

Other kinds of projects, however, need to rely more heavily on the measurement of sentiment to accurately gauge success. Taulbee Jackson, President and CEO of Raidious, a digital communications company that helps build audiences for brands, oversaw the social media channels around Super Bowl XLVI. In addition to tracking reach, amplification, influence and activity, Jackson kept a close eye on sentiment. He seemed especially proud that sentiment metrics suggested that for every two members of the Super Bowl audience who had a negative experience, three had a positive experience. Since this ratio rarely reaches two-to-one, an overwhelmingly positive sentiment suggests that Jackson’s social media efforts were a resounding success.

Ultimately, a combination of tangible metrics and sentiment provides the richest depiction of a social media campaign. And an emerging trend is getting to know exactly who an organization’s fans are.

“We’ll see an increase in the understanding of the customer,” said Bodzewski, who cited Facebook Connect as allowing companies to know not only more about their fans, but also about the social graph of those fans. “More companies will prompt for this information.”

While the panel referred to a few specific tools they use to track such social metrics—Hootsuite plugins, Radian 6, Bit.ly, Viral Heat, Social Motion and Socialbakers—they were quick to point out that there is no magic tool that will help a company measure social media.

“It’s so frustrating when you hear people say that social media is free,” said Hepburn. “It requires a lot of resources and a lot of effort to pull it off. You have to put a lot in to get a lot out, and that’s something a lot of social media evangelists never say.”

Devotion to such resources, however, is no longer a bonus. It’s a necessity.

“At Nokia we now pit social media at the center,” said Hepburn. “The world today is connected. Instead of starting from a traditional perspective, we’re putting social at the center and building things around it. We’re socializing everything and putting people at the center of our decisions.”

 

Ashley Mayo joined Golf Digest Publications in 2007. As the associate editor, her responsibilities include writing monthly equipment articles, overseeing various aspects of golfdigest.com, and initiating social media campaigns. Mayo graduated from the University of Virginia in 2007, and she’s currently a part-time student at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, where she’s studying to get her Master of Science degree in Digital Journalism. She currently lives in NYC, where she has miraculously managed to maintain a 4 handicap.