Social Sex With Cindy Gallop @SMW14 #NYCRewind

Does your partner really know you? Do you tell each other what really turns you on, or what bedroom maneuvers you’ve always wanted to try? Chances are, you haven’t, and you’re not alone. As a nation, we shy away from real pillow-talk with our closest companion, preventing us from going further in the bedroom. Even with constant exposure to sexual content in pop culture and 24/7 access to porn, sex remains one of the most taboo topics of conversation amongst couples. Durex®, a global sexual wellbeing brand, believes everyone should have a healthy and emotionally fulfilling sex life and knows regular communication is key to having great sex. This year, the brand wants to rid the taboos around ‘sex talk’ by encouraging couples to initiate the conversation in the bedroom.

In line with this mission, Durex has created a hub of online tips and videos to help couples talk about sex and their relationships in a healthy way; from sharing what you want in bed to an online fantasy finder for couples to ‘sexplore’ with one another. Durex has also explored the role technology plays in communicating with our loved ones. Given social media has revolutionized how we access everything in our lives, it comes as no surprise that it has impacted and intruded upon our relationships. A recent survey by Durex found that while technology has us using our hands more than ever, all that smartphone tapping has overtaken real touch between couples . When asked what methods they most frequently use to talk to their partner, 77 percent answered using their smartphone, with only 19 percent regularly communicating through touch. Based on these findings, Durex challenged couples to turn off their phones and focus on turning on their partner over the Valentine’s Day Weekend by discovering the Language of Touch.

Building on this, Durex partnered with Cindy Gallop, founder and CEO of MakeLoveNotPorn.com, to trigger this much-needed conversation at last year’s New York Social Media Week, on February 20, 2014. The afternoon sessions explored topics including the future of the sex world and what it means for innovators and marketers. The session looked at the ways that media and entertainment are propagating unrealistic portrayals of sex and how this negatively impacts society, and could be a barrier to real-sex conversations between couples. Representatives from these industries, including Aurore Trepo, Marketing Director for Durex, discussed how everyone has a part to play in inspiring healthier representation of real sex in the media.

Are you ready for more? With the all-inclusive Insider Pass to the standard Campus Passes to just scoping out the HQ, we want to give you the opportunity to see it all. Starting Wednesday, November 5th, SMW NYC Passes will be available at a Super Early Bird discount, saving you 50% off the standard price. This flash sale won’t last long — just 48 hours — don’t miss it!

The 8 Best Ideas From @SMW14 #NYCRewind

Social Media Week New York featured so many amazing moments from Eli Pariser taking to the stage to talk all things Upworthy, for the first time since the site has become viewed by over 60 billion people a month, to Vice’s discussions on long form video to JWT stressing our need to change as images take over the web.

Below, we pulled together the best ideas that came out of last year’s sessions. Are you ready for more? With the all-inclusive Insider Pass to the standard Campus Passes to just scoping out the HQ, we want to give you the opportunity to see it all. Starting Wednesday, November 5th, SMW NYC Passes will be available at a Super Early Bird discount, saving you 50% off the standard price. This flash sale won’t last long — just 48 hours — don’t miss it!

What’s trending isn’t always important

Good news organizations (and brands) bring together aspirational and behavioral signals to balance their content. Both need to be treated equally and both need to be fed. This includes looking at what people do (share, click, create community action) and what they say.
Is the content both compelling and substantive? The answer should be yes. And importantly, companies like Upworthy are looking at a new engagement metric they’re calling attention minutes and are going to the community to get their feedback on what they want the future of content to be.

By reading behavior in the context of aspirations, we should now look at content in terms of “Am I doing it right?” and not “Are they interested?”

Data will rule – but we won’t care

Data is becoming more relevant and accessible and more tailored to our personal interests. By 2020, we might see Google Now-like technology permeate our lives, making data available before we ask for it, and helping us keep track of our habits and routines. Our main function will be to optimize the feed, or adjust it in the moment.

Any app that’s relevant to you will be able to provide alerts or info, relevant to you, at a key time, possibly before you ask for it. For example: Your fitness-activity monitor, which knows you go running every Tuesday and Thursday, will let you know one of the streets on your route is closed due to construction and will know how to adjust your route, while keeping your distance, elevation, and other metrics generally the same.

The leaders of the next digital revolution will be unexpected

Steve Case, CEO of Revolution, a Washington, D.C.-based investment firm he co-founded in 2005, is best known as one of the founders of America Online, launched when only when only 3% of personal-computer users were online. AOL was the first Internet company to go public, in 1992, when it had only 200,000 users. “You just gotta persevere,” he said.

To find innovation, it pays to look beyond Silicon Valley and New York City. “Good ideas can be anywhere,” Case said, citing hidden gems like Austin and parts of North Carolina. Young entrepreneurs live in a world of greater diversity and opportunity where the people behind the company matter less than the quality of the idea.

To fully access troves of talent, America needs immigration reform to compete with countries with more lax laws, Case said.

The death of CPM ad units is near

Storytelling is exactly the same as it was 50 years ago. That’s how we like to consume information. The “way” we tell stories is what has changed. Can’t just put an ad on the internet because it doesn’t make sense.

Native advertising has a great role to play in the solution, but makes up a very small amount of ads. We have developed banner blindness – so we can develop social sponsored blindness too.

Advertisers should be scared by the prospect of Pandora One, Netflix – places where consumers pay to not see ads. Just because attention is there, doesn’t automatically mean advertising will follow. But if we do have the attention, the frequency model goes away. Everything changes.

Great content will come from anywhere

We need to be more creative with multimedia in an age of social and mobile. At one time, text was the main tool of reporting news. But with more people creating rich media content, mainstream reporting has discovered new ways to use multi-media.Anything that doesn’t entertain, engage and inform will not break through the noise. Ironically enough, the most accessed and engaged content on the NYTimes.com website isn’t even a feature or news story. It was a quiz that identified your regional dialect though a clever quiz…written by an intern!

This is proof that great content can come from anywhere, not just professional sources.

Things designed to be shared will have higher value

Trust is the most profound part of this collaborative economy. In a sharing economy, buyers and the sellers are peers, and entrepreneurs are designing things that are more easily shared because we want them to go through many hands. Thus, things designed to be shared will have higher value. For example, people drive 80% less when they use Zipcar than if they owned their own vehicle—and 40% of users have never owned one, which has led to our streets being filled with 40,000 fewer cars.As Robin Chase, founder of Zipcar and Buzzcar noted: “You have to be building community in everything you’re doing.”

Longform video works…if you do it right

The whole notion that people don’t want to watch long stuff on the internet is not true. People are watching longer videos than ever before and not just the 2 minute plug & play. Of course this only works if they are packaged effectively. It’s more about how you package and showcase a story than having a well-known celebrity in your video.Where do publishers like Vice and Motherboard get their stories for videos? By reading everything and being early to report. It’s about working with what you’ve got. If you have a good story, go out and make it.

“When we look for a great character, we look for someone is going to be open and has a great personality,” said Motherboard’s editor-in-chief, Derek Mead.

A cleverly staged moment in a long form piece, can result in a genuine emotional reaction from your viewers but if the story drags on, it won’t work no matter the length of the video. Always leave them wanting more.

Content lasts longer on Pinterest

Each day there is 60+ million users, 100s million pins, 1B+ connections on Pinterest. It’s a very aspirational platform and allows you to show who you want to be. On the other hand, Twitter is about what you are doing and Facebook is about who you are.It makes sense that the half life of a tweet is 5-25 mins, the half life of a Facebook post is 80 mins, and the half life of Pinterest content is >1 week. This means you MUST think about quality rather than quantity when you pin, and determine what the best content is around the topic that you can curate? It’s especially important as pins are more than images. Rich pins provide context, commercial foundation, and addresses stale links.

As content lives longer, if you want to get people for the Christmas rush, posting in November is too late. The optimal time to pin for Christmas is August or September due to the long half-life.