Building an East Coast Tech Center: What’s in Store for NYC’s Future?


Last week’s panel, “New York City’s Tech Future“, got everyone thinking about how far New York City has come and how much farther we need to go. There was a lot of discussion about how New York City differs from Silicon Valley. In New York the innovation is at smaller venues and companies, we haven’t quite gotten our big Google or Facebook yet. However, Jonathan Bowles, Executive Director of the Center for an Urban Future, noted, “we’re seeing that a lot of corporations are reaching out to these smaller companies for acquisition and services”. Alan Patricof, Managing Director of Greycroft Partners, also noted that the model of fundraising is different in NYC. He noted that few firms do B-Round ($5-$15MM) here and there is a lot of seed capital around, a lot of VCs have cashed out and become angels. Additionally, Patricof noted, “A-Round requires going to an organized firm like Greycroft and there aren’t a lot of firms like these in NYC.” Nevertheless, Bowles noted that 486 start-ups got VC or angel funding last year and of those, 15 had raised $50MM+.

There are also several issues related to the recruitment of talent in NYC. Bowles pointed out – liveability and quality of life are key issues. He suggested that, in order to attract more talent in engineering and entrepreneurship, the next mayor will have to focus on creating more middle-income affordable housing, as most tech/start-up employees aren’t making six figures.

Students are another big issue. A few of the panelists suggested that there is a tendency for recent grads to start their companies near where they went to school, especially because of the focus on intellectual property on campuses, how students can and will take risks, and the advantageous recruiting opportunities that proximity presents.  This focused the conversation on the new Cornell Tech campus on Roosevelt Island. Anne Li, the Managing Director, EVP at NYCEDC, argued the case for NYC to focus on tech. Li said, “NYC is underweight in the number of engineers we produce…there are not that many industries we can diversify ourselves into but tech is one”. She also noted that similar projects in other countries have been funded by the government. However, our city’s government doesn’t have those kinds of funds to give. So, the focus has really been on the universities. That’s where the partnership with Israel’s Technion came to play on this campus proposal. Israel has demonstrated itself as a country that has a strong grasp on how to commercialize research. Additionally, several other city universities have started to further develop their tech programs. NYU has started a Center for Urban Science & Progress in Brooklyn and Columbia University is expanding its engineering school. Li estimates that the three projects combined will double the number of engineers (PhDs) in 20 years. She also suggested that work is being done at the high school level as well. Li says, “great coders learn how to code in high school not college”, so there’s a computer science high school in the works.

The discussion of what students want to do after they graduate also came into play. Patricof suggested that most students in NYC want to start their own company when perhaps instead they should be “looking to join a big company to bring entrepreneurial spirit or join an existing start-up”. He noted that there are a lot of companies that are imitating one another these days:  “You should start a company if you have a passion and you’ve learned a lot about it and you have a plan, not hunt for ideas or copy what someone else has done and say ‘I’m gonna do it better'”. Scott Anderson, Partner & Chief Strategy Officer at Control Group, backed him up by saying that his company looks for more skilled workers and sees great value in new recruits who have failed before. Patricof furthered the argument of the value of having worked at a failed start-up: “They don’t assign people different roles so you learn everything…you watch and learn from an unsophisticated leader and then you’re ready to do a start-up because you’ve seen the pitfalls and not spent your own money.”

So, the overall feeling was that New York City can become a more attractive destination for engineers and entrepreneurs by building more academic resources for students and by making the city a better and more affordable place to live for experienced talent. Recent graduates will need to start shifting the attention toward joining existing start-ups rather than creating imitative start-ups of their own. There will also need to be the economic support and incentive to allow them to do this – through improved fundraising avenues for  start-ups, affordable housing options, etc.

Victoria Harman (@vc1harman) is a social media content & strategy specialist and entrepreneur based in New York City.

Master Class: Engagement@Scale – Three Steps to Leveraging Brand Advocates


On 20 February 2013, I had the pleasure of attending Master Class: Engagement@Scale – Three Steps to Leveraging Brand Advocates with Dachis Group. Speakers from the Dachis Group included: Michael (MJ) Jones, Vice President of Technology; Liz Schroeter Courtney, Social Strategist and Allison Squires, Social Strategist.

The presentation focused on social marketing as the ideal way for brands to authentically interact and scale engagement with customers. Social media facilitates messaging large groups of people. Additionally, panelists spoke about leveraging brand advocates, a brand’s most trusted and effective audience group, to spread a brand’s presence beyond internal corporate efforts.

The Dachis Group offered a three step approach to working with brand advocates around (I) identification, (II) mobilization and (III) measurement.

How do companies identify advocates?

Advocates:
+ Frequently talk about particular brands
+ Have positive feelings about particular brands
+ Desire to influence others
+ Advocates should be people that others trust

According to Edelman’s trust index, people trust academics, experts, people like me and employees at a company more than CEOs, government institutions and financial analysts.

“Friends are better marketers than marketers.”

92% of people trust earned media, such as word-of-mouth.

What’s more, 67% spend more online after receiving recommendations from online communities.

It’s the power of advocacy.

How do companies mobilize advocates?

+ Foster relationships — Make advocates feel valued
+ Create mutually beneficial relationships – Reward your advocates
+ Must be authentic, not just driven by money

Good examples of brand advocacy include:
+ Red Bull
+ Coffee Mate
+ Starbucks
+ Vitamin Water

How do companies measure results of working with brand advocates?

The aforementioned companies successfully mobilized advocates to increase customer awareness and mindshare in the market.  Things to consider:
+ Increasing the reach of the brand
+ Enthusiasm and sentiment
+ Conversion patterns and business impact
+ Community engagement
+ Frequent activity, frequent brand mentions and frequent purchases

Finally, give advocates space to engage with the company’s audience. Does your company provide forums, community events, product initiatives, etc. Help advocates develop a suite of experiences for audiences to engage and invigorate positive feelings about your brand.

Want to see it for yourself?

Lisa Chau has been involved with Web 2.0 since graduate school at Dartmouth College, where she completed an independent study on blogging. She was subsequently highlighted as a woman blogger in Wellesley Magazine, published by her alma mater. Lisa currently works as an Assistant Director in Alumni Relations at Dartmouth College. She has been published in US News and Forbes. You can follow her on Twitter.

Local to Global: Social Media in the Markets of New York City

New York City is known for many things: Broadway, art, crowds, music, fashion, tourism, etc. But, the core passion of every New Yorker is our dedication and passion for food. Delicious food.

It was of great interest then for Karen Seiger  (Author/ Founder of Markets of New York City) to moderate a panel discussion with local, food entrepreneurs on their use of social media to cultivate an audience – Local to Global: Social Media in the Markets of New York City. The five food artisans in attendance were:

Fany Gerson, chef and owner of La Newyorkina
Liz Gutman, co-founder of Liddabit Sweets
Simon Tung, co-owner of Macaron Parlour
Susan Povich, co-founder of Red Hook Lobster Pound
Allison Robicelli, chef/author/blogger/co-founder of Robicelli’s

Developing an Online Voice and Personality. While each purveyor differed in their preferences for a social media platform, the general consensus was the need to 1) develop the right tone that best reflected the personality of their brand as well as 2) the right interaction to engage their online audience. Social media has greatly hastened and cultivated our current need for transparency. Now, customers want to know the full 360 who is behind the product, what is the owner’s personality and background, what happens on a daily or weekly basis, etc. Fany Gerson, whose paletas (Mexican ice pops) are highly popular in Manhattan, noted that she tweets in both Spanish and English as a nod to her cultural roots and diverse clientele. Allison Robicelli recounted she began with the oft-started professional tone. But when she finally let her true personality/voice take over, posting comedic and entertaining accounts of her life via stream-of-consciousness thinking, her online audience increased dramatically not only locally, but internationally as well.

More Content Than Advertising. A beginner’s faux-pas that each panelist stressed should be avoided was the assumption that every post and tweet focus on advertising the product. You want to be a conversationalist, not a commercial. A majority of online actions should be focused on interacting with your customers (answering questions, commenting on their posts/tweets) and providing content (industry-related topics or news, photos, events, personal opinions).

Crowdsourcing Ideas and Feedback. Social media is instantaneous and real-time, so business owners can immediately receive feedback on their customer needs, preferences, and requests. It’s the improved, straight-from-the-source, focus group model. Simon Tung relayed an experience when he received customer comments regarding an issue with one of his baked goods. He quickly examined the product, confirmed the validity of his customer critiques, and immediately removed the product from the shelves. Allison Robicelli continually asks her customers for cupcake flavors as well as recommendations for past cupcake flavors that should be reintroduced.

Crowdfunding for Business Growth. Not only does social media provide audience engagement and communication, but it can also be used as a vehicle for raising capital. Both La Newyorkina and Red Hook Lobster Pound suffered great loss during Hurricane Sandy as their kitchens were located in Red Hook. Fany Gerson, of La Newyorkina, created a Kickstarter campaign to raise capital ($20,000) in order to rebuild her entire kitchen. Gerson’s strong community of fans and peers mobilized as fundraising ambassadors on her behalf via social media networks, resulting in La Newyorkina over-exceeding the initial $20,000 goal within one week.

Handling Customer Complaints. Most of the panelists handle customer complaints through Facebook and Twitter, but mention Yelp and everyone lets out an exasperated sigh. Yelp seems to be the bane of any food-related business owner. While there are valid criticisms, a majority of the negative reviews are from privilege-minded individuals who expected special treatment  during their visit or from individuals who leave negative reviews to receive future special treatment. Business owners must learn to ascertain and identify which reviews are legitimate in order to conduct follow-up. Susan Povich of Red Hook Lobster Pound reviews Yelp for dissatisfied customers and sends them a specially coded gift certificate. When someone shows up with said coded certificate at any of the locations, employees ensure that specific customer has an exemplary second experience. Additionally, this allows Povich to track conversion rates for customer service.

Your Peers Are Also Your Community. It’s a small world and in the food entrepreneurship industry, it’s even smaller. Each of the panelists stressed the importance of authenticity and relationship building not only with customers, but also with fellow peers within the field. Working in silos was never an option to them, nor was it a mentality they wanted. The panelists and their peers became secondary family, helping one another during various markets, providing advice on business matters, brain-storming ideas on culinary initiatives, and sharing kitchen space and resources when needed. This community spirit, carried over on to social media platforms, indirectly helped increase customer engagement and followers. Customers would read online interactions between the business owners; begin following the companies they were previously unaware of; involve themselves within said business conversations; visit the recently-followed food establishments to taste the products; and most importantly, the customers would then provide reviews and endorsement of the products/companies through their own personal social networks of friends.

For the burgeoning food entrepreneur, the major takeaways to heed are: find the right platform; create your online voice/persona; interact with your audience AUTHENTICALLY (talk with them, respond to them, ask for feedback); don’t be a commercial and hard-sell your products; always provide content through your social media platforms; and create a community with your peers.

Success takes time, but community support is what carries you to the finish line.

Lisa Hoang is an arts administrator who is now immersed in all things digital media, tech, and healthy eating. She is currently the Assistant Director for NYU-SCPS overseeing academic programs in Digital Media Marketing, Digital Publishing, and Leadership/Human Capital Management. Lisa has a B.S. in Fine Art/Illustration from Towson University as well as an M.P.S. in Arts and Cultural Management from Pratt Institute. She spends a majority of her time testing the limits of her metabolism. You can find more about her at: www.vizify.com/lisa-c-hoang.

Takeaways From #GivingTuesday

Fundraisers have a lot to learn from the success of #GivingTuesday — make it simple, make it social. At the SMWNYC event — Giving Gangham Style: An Ideathon with the #GivingTuesday Team — a social gooderati crowd gathered eager to learn more about the simple-social potion and commune around this holy day.

The #GivingTuesday team panelist, Henry Timms (92Y) Sharon Feder (Mashable) and Aaron Sherinian (UN Foundation) said it all started with a good hook that latched on to the start of the giving season and the Black Friday, Cyber Monday consumer exhaustion. With a good idea in hand, the next step was to go social. Yet this wasn’t to tell everyone what to do, but to invite everyone to the party. The first gift made was this idea to anyone who wanted to get involved.

When 2,600 partners and nonprofits jumped on the platform, the #GivingTuesday team were gracious hosts. They facilitated the event, listened to their guests and then made changes based on their suggestions. Then when someone gave, they felt good about it, felt apart of something and felt ok to brag tweet about their philanthropic ways.

The panel facilitator Susan McPherson (Fenton) outlined three big takeaways:

+ Listen more than you speak.
+ When you have a great idea, collaborate.
+ Use every tool at your disposable.

In other words, anti-nothing and pro-everything is the giving mantra. But how did this diner-menu  strategy not become overwhelming? Again, it was that simple hook and hashtag that acted as a north star guiding everyone to one call to action on one day — give on Tuesday. All everyone else had to do is point to that same star and say yes.

@AmandaLehner is a digital strategist based in New York City.

All Earned Media is Not Created Equal

This week we’re hearing a lot about earned media, ROI, storytelling and brand ambassadors. But is all earned media the same?

Our partners House Party say no.

It’s a bold statement and they can back it up. Friday, they’ll be covering in more detail (and we recommend you check it out here). But to prepare, we think you’ll enjoy their newly released White Paper.

We know that creating experiences is invaluable for brands. It’s not about pushing out content; it’s about conversation and relationships. You hear it every year. But what may get overlooked is that experience-driven social marketing, when properly done, can be the most powerful medium in the mix.

Brands seek out earned media over paid media because it is the most powerful form of advertising. The same should be true for experience-driven advertising. The deeper engagement of in-person brand experiences will ultimately drive stronger advocacy. This leads to bigger and longer-lasting brand and sales lifts. And the better you do, the stronger results.

But it doesn’t stop there. If you have a truly experience-driven social presence, then the rest of what you do is so much more effective- and much more measurable.

“Experience-driven social wins hearts and minds.” House Party has found that experience-driven social can increase favorability by 161%, advocacy by 206%, and purchase-intent by 187%. That’s impressive.

“Experience-driven social opens wallets.” House Party also found that it can increase sales by 10% and ROI by $2, in gross profit.

What’s more, if you do your campaign well, you come out with incredible content, and user-generated content at that. There’s also more opt-ins, feedback and audience feedback. This all goes back to your ROI- and doesn’t let up.

The moral of the story? Create experiences. Download House Party’s White Paper to learn more- then join us tomorrow to engage in a deep discussion around it.

Digital Quicksilver – How Marketers Can Harness the Power of Influence on Social Media to Drive Brand Affinity

This is a guest post by Rob McLoughlin, SVP Consumer Insights at Buzzmedia

Influence is a fluid social currency connecting those who possess knowledge or topical expertise and those that seek it. At Buzzmedia, we study these dynamics every day to provide insights into the complex relationships between brands, content and millennial consumers.

To that end, we partnered with NewStream Research on original research project to explore this important topic and are thrilled to present the results for the first time this Friday at the Lifestyle and Culture Hub at Hearst.

Here’s a preview of what we found:

+ Social media plays a critically important role in the dynamic relationship between brands, content and influencers. Seventy-six percent of millennials follow brands on social media and when seeking to obtain information about brands and products, social media influences four in ten millennials. Recommendations from friends and family are most influential, but recommendations from a perceived topic expert carry nearly equal weight in social media. Over 70 percent of millennials share items from brands and nearly 40 percent of millennials have had their view of a brand and site changed positively due to a mutual association. Branded content on social media is influential and helps drive positive and sometimes immediate action for brands. Influential content has driven over 82 percent of millennials to visit a brand website and over two-thirds of millennials have purchased, saved or shared something that they viewed as influential or interesting.

+ There exists a strong synergistic relationship between brands, online content and individual influencers. Each element adds logic and strength to one another in the consumer mindset. The combination of all three can help to reinforce the core values of the consumer, but it is a relationship that has preconditions and needs to be actively managed with care in order to truly be considered influential. Over 80 percent of millennials rank “trustworthiness,” “credibility” and “authenticity” as either the first, second or third most important element that impacts whether content, brands or people (influencers) are influential to them online.

+ Millennials consumers hold strong and definitive impressions about brands. These impressions are developed over time based on a mix of both online and offline experiences. Eighty-one percent of millennials view brands as a “measure of quality” and 77 percent consider brands to be “what distinguishes a product,” and therefore they are seen as “more than just companies.”  In order to build trust and foster credibility and authenticity, brands need to actively manage interactions to ensure that each exposure is constructive and fostering increased affinity and loyalty towards the brand.

+ Brand characteristics are incredibly important in creating influence among millennials. Brands that are viewed as “creative,” “innovative,” “compassionate” and “stylish” are key characteristics cited by millennials as helping to create and sustain influence. Female millennials in particular are slightly more likely to think that creativity is what makes a brand influential. Females are also more likely than men to consider “compassion” and “style” important brand characteristics for driving influence.

+ Brands can also drive influence via actions to connect with millennials and increase affinity. Millennial consumers see value in brands that provide “excellent customer service,” that create and share “humorous and engaging advertising” and “contributing to charitable causes.”  Additional actions that drive affinity include brands that “sponsor online content or events of consumer interest” and brands that “partner with companies that are perceived as cool or cutting edge.” Brands that execute these actions for consumers stand to reap significant rewards in terms of increased affinity and loyalty.

+ Millennials have strong opinions about the relationship between the type of information they seek online and the person they deem most credible at delivering that information. We asked millennials to rate four different types of influencers based on their credibility when delivering information on various product categories as well as their influence on a variety of brand dimensions. Across all product categories, topical expertise is most important for driving influence. Millennials feel that topic experts with broad fame and topic experts with contextual fame are most influential for sharing credible information across every product category.

+ Brands, content and influencers live a complex and ever changing ecosystem. In order to obtain, build and sustain influence and affinity with millennials, each must build a relationship that is based on a foundation of trust, credibility and authenticity. Influence is not an entity and therefore does not reside within one individual, site or brand. Influence is a process – and every piece of the process needs to be managed properly to have an impact.

Join us tomorrow to learn more!

Thursday: Newly Added & Open Events

Day 2 is almost over, but that doesn’t mean SMW NYC is close to ending. With so many events, you could have missed some great ones. We also added a few new ones. So, to highlight open and newly added events, we recommend you checking these out:

New at our Global HQ

9:30: Master Class: Build Insanely Effective Landing Pages With Old School Secrets
4:30: Social Collaboration: Nokia Lumia 820 Design Challenge: The winner is…
5:00: Performance: Max ZT, Hammer Dulcimer


At our Content Hubs & Across the City

9:30 at JWT: FORTUNE Interview w/ Bonin Bough, Followed by panel: The Secret Sauce of Native Advertising? Authenticity
9:30 at 92Y: Half The Sky Movement: Using Transmedia to Inspire Real Impact
9:30 at Hearst: The Shift from Presentation to Participation, A Discussion With HuffPost Live’s President Roy Sekoff
12 at 92Y: Healthy Living: How Behavior and Patients Can Fix Healthcare, with Jay Parkinson, Greatist, StartupHealth.
12 at JWT: Technology, Advertising & Startup Council (TASC)
2:30 at 92Y: Cowbird and the Storytelling Life: A Visual Story Workshop
2:30 at Bloomberg: Purpose: Driving the New Economy
6 at JWT: Deep Focus Presents: An Evening of Disruption
6 at 92Y: Connections: How the Internet of Things is Transforming Our Social World
8 at JWT: Controller Rocks the Stage: A Night of Music at JWT
7 at Projective Space: “The Magical Sharing Experiment”: Launch of yerdle in NYC presented by Let’s Collaborate!

Don’t wait any longer- we’re running out of time! Register now, and join us tomorrow!

Wednesday Events You Can Still Sign Up For

It’s SMW NYC! We know not everyone has registered to join us but don’t fret. We have an incredible schedule for tomorrow with some spots still available for you. Without further ado, here’s our Top 10 events you can still sign up for!

9:30 at Bloomberg: Innovate or Die: Are You About To Have A Kodak Moment?
9:30 at JWT: Native advertising: An elegant evolution or just another paid placement?
9:30 at 92Y: Girls Education and Women’s Empowerment in Real World Social Networks
9:30 at Hearst: It’s Complicated: Dating and Relationships in the Digital Age
12 at Bloomberg: PSFK Presents The Future of Work: Making Social Work in Collaborative Workplaces
12 at Hearst: Running: Social Implications of the Global Equalizer
12 at JWT: What’s On Your Plate?: How Digital Has Evolved Our Palates
2:30 at 92Y: Social + Grassroots = Change
2:30 at Bloomberg: Social As the Great Equalizer: Interviews with Companies Large and Small
2:30 at Hearst: Daria Musk and Google: Social Media and the Rock Star
6 at Bloomberg: The Problems Entrepreneurs Should Be Solving Over The Next 3 Years, hosted by American Express OPEN Forum

Don’t wait any longer- we’re running out of time! Register now, and join us tomorrow!

5 Minutes With MKG’s Dave Brown

MKG creates experiential programs that connect trendsetting consumers, influencers and the media to brands. They exist to engage, entertain and brighten people’s lives through the experiences they create. So, obviously, it was a no-brainer when we chose them as our partner in crime for the production of this year’s Ideas Connected at Global HQ. While we’ve enjoyed working with the whole MKG team, we’ve got a real soft-spot for Dave Brown, MKG’s Director of Digital Strategy. Here he shares his thoughts on social marketing, digital innovation and our upcoming event!

1. Tell us about your goals for SMW. As co-host of Ideas Connected and our first Global HQ, what do you hope attendees will take away from the experience?
We’re totally excited about co-hosting Social Media Week’s first Global HQ. We’ve all attended way too many conferences that left us feeling underwhelmed, so this event provides us with an opportunity to flip the idea of a typical conference on its head and create something new and fresh with Crowdcentric. It’s been really enjoyable working together and we hope to make this a memorable experience for our attendees. From the very beginning it’s been our goal to create a space that’s warm, inviting and would organically facilitate networking, connections and the sharing of ideas. We hope attendees walk away feeling like they’ve had a powerful and encouraging experience.

2. As a pioneer in experiential marketing, how has social media affected the field? How does that inform MKG’s work?
Social Media has evolved to the point where we don’t see it as a separate strategy for experiential marketing. It’s fully integrated into the entire vision of a brand and we bake that into our approach here at MKG. You can’t discuss marketing or branding without deeply considering social media. That’s the most exciting part. It’s a new language. It’s a new craft. And, whether you’re a community manager or a digital strategist it’s become an art form to bridge online and offline experiences for audiences so that it’s a frictionless experience which ultimately delivers meaningful results.

3. What has been MKG’s greatest success with Social Media to date?
Fortunately, I’m part of a team at MKG that has seen a lot of success. Our creative execution of ideas is notable. But, if I had to pick one event that stood out for me, it would be the Delta Instawalk at Madison Square Garden. The challenge was to break through all the noise found at major sporting events. We solved this by inviting a talented group of Instagram photographers to come in and document the New York Rangers’ playoff run. We provided them with unprecedented access and experiences that even traditional media hadn’t done before. The outcome was nothing short of beautiful. Our use of Instagram as a storytelling mechanism created a really rich experience for audiences. It reached millions of people in an organic way and set a new standard for what can be done in the realm of social media.

4. What do you think is the most exciting thing happening in the emerging technology and/or new media space right now?

I love the level of personalization I’m seeing across the board. From social connections to anticipated results based on my actions and networks, it’s really exciting. It’s the humanization of big data and how its service is relieving pain points in peoples’ lives so we can spend more time focusing on the things that matter. A great example of this is the social connections feature on Airbnb. There’s no doubt we’ll be seeing more brands and services incorporating this level of personalization and speed of delivery into their offering. This is where things get really exciting and we’re just scratching the surface.

5. What brands do you think are leading the way in innovation with social and digital?
There are so many I admire. Holstee is one of my favorite brands. They’re a great example of how creativity and positive inspiration can build an eco-friendly brand. Another is Photojojo. They consistently remind me that passion, personality and strong communication can build audiences. Oh, and I can’t forget The New York Rangers. They have a really strong digital presence and provide fans with so much access and information through the use of various social channels. As a die-hard hockey fan, I find this both valuable and engaging. All of these brands use social media in fascinating ways to do basic storytelling. It’s exciting to see them grow and resonate with their audiences across the globe.

6. What are you looking forward to most at SMWNYC 2013?
I’m looking forward to watching people connect with what we’ve been building for the last three months. It’s been an incredible, collaborative process and I’m really excited for people to take it all in, get their hands dirty, build things, learn and share skills, make new connections and forget that you’re even at a conference. In one section of the experiential space we have an area called HQ Office Hours where we’ll be offering our ideas and advice to attendees. Anyone can approach us on anything from social media marketing, pitching us their ideas, asking for advice, sharing tips on their favorite app or wanting a restaurant recommendation for the night. It’s going to be a blast and the team and I can’t wait to engage in great conversations with the audience and give out a few solid Hi-Fives.

7. This year, our global theme is “Open & Connected: Principles for a Collaborative World.” How does MKG embody or support this idea?
Our founder, Maneesh K. Goyal is an architect for brands and his expertise is at the heart of our company. We’re passionate about creating memorable experiences that bring people together and deliver meaningful results. This matched with Social Media Week’s Open & Connected DNA spawned our natural partnership. We’re not just saying “ideas connected,” we’re living it.

8. What is the most creative way you’ve seen social media used?
I’ve witnessed so many creative applications of social media. Everything from crowdsourced funding for positive social change to neighbors helping each other in moments of crisis. Social Media always finds a way to surprise me in its application. Its beautiful. But on a more simple level, one of the most creative applications of social media (that anyone can do) is when a brand or a person recognizes a need and fills it with unbending kindness. We call this love bombs and they’re some of the best bi-products of social media. I really enjoy when I see someone say they wish XYZ would happen, and someone with the ability to make that happen does. It’s awesome. You see brands do it. You see people do it. And I hope that contagion continues to spread as social media grows into the future.

Follow Dave_Brown on Twitter: @holidaymatinee

5 Minutes With JWT


JWT is the world’s best-known marketing communications brand, and a true global network with 200-plus offices in over 90 countries. This, year JWT returns to Social Media Week New York as host to our Advertising & Marketing content hub. We sat down with CEO of JWT North America, David Eastman, to chat about their role in this year’s event:

1. This will be the fourth year that JWT New York has partnered with Social Media Week. Why is SMW an event that your company keeps returning to?
First of all, we love partnering with SMW. Being involved in the conversation about how technology is shaping our lives and impacting the way we connect with each other is both fascinating and important to us as an agency. The sessions at Social Media Week cover a lot of surface area and bring people together from across different industries, passions and areas of expertise. We’re proud to be part of it.

2. This year, our global theme is “Open & Connected: Principles for a Collaborative World.” How does JWT embody or support this idea?
JWT is a network, and in order to work efficiently our network needs to be open and connected to itself, our partners and clients. The accelerating rate of change in our industry means that, as one of the largest global agencies with more than 200 offices in 90 countries, collaboration has to be at the heart of how we operate. So I’d say that we embody, support and are an example of your global theme!

3. What trends do you see emerging in advertising?
Statistically, this will be the year where we see social becoming predominantly mobile because internet use via smartphones and tablets will surpass access by laptops and desktops. This inflection point will unleash yet another disruptive wave of creativity in web experiences, content and applications. I also see this all as a positive for TV advertising as, in order to keep our attention, it will need to surprise and delight more often.

4. Which of your campaigns have been the more creative and successful in the past year?
Rather than give a list, as a general answer I would say that the value of a great idea, well executed, and based on a great insight that reflects or forms culture has not changed, but the opportunities to exploit one have multiplied exponentially over the last few years, which makes it a great time to be in the brand building business.

5. JWT New York’s Band-Aid Magic Vision interactive campaign just received a great nod from AdForum’s Greatest Hits. Can you tell us more about the campaign and JWT’s expansion into interactive advertising?
The augmented reality category is littered with applications that focus on technology for technology’s sake, so this was an opportunity for us to use AR for something far more powerful. With Band-Aid Magic Vision, we wanted to do something fun, bold and meaningful for parents and their children. When parents and children scanned their Band-Aid bandage via a smartphone or tablet, it instantly became a stage for interactive entertainment designed to entertain kids’ pain away. The platform also provided a new media platform, unlocking infinite possibilities of ways to enhance the consumer brand experience. To say we’ve expanded into interactive advertising belies the fact that we’ve been doing it in some form or another for years now, but with Jeff Benjamin at the helm creatively we’re making more of a mark, as evidenced by the fact that this effort won Gold in the mobile category at Cannes last year.

6. Can you give us a preview of what you might discuss during your Social Media Week opening keynote?
I’m going to talk firstly about the surface volatility of the social ecosystem that is constantly creating new ways for all these elements to work together. Then about the fact that underneath this surface volatility I see a long-term geological shift happening: Social is moving quickly from ‘destination’ to ‘layer,’ and burrowing down into the undercarriage of the web to become part of its infrastructure. It is, in effect, eating the web.

7. What should SMW NYC attendees expect to see from JWT’s Advertising & Marketing Hub?
Expect to hear panels that delve into social media and the implications it has for marketers, consumers, technology, start ups and more. It’s going to be a draw for the beginner who is just getting into the industry as well as the seasoned professional. From JWT, we are hosting a few different events that are going to be great. Following her successful Social Media Week session last year, our Director of Trendspotting Ann Mack will be back, hosting a solo talk “Going Private in Public” (one of the trends surveyed in her 10 Trends for 2013 report), which explores reclaiming privacy in our lives where living publicly has become the default. We’re also going to dive into the realm of food in “What’s on Your Plate: How Digital Has Evolved Our Palates,” as we bring together some of today’s most influential foodies (think Yummly, Nestle, StudioFeast) who are pushing the bounds of what’s possible with food and technology. And with CSR efforts becoming an increasingly significant part of brand strategy and business models, our panel “Societal Brands in a Societal World” is going to take a closer look at how brands like Warby Parker are starting to adopt principles that are weighed not just by transactions alone but by their value to society.

What Is Social Customer Service Anyway?

This is a guest post by Josh March, CEO of Conversocial.

Social media may seem like such a fully-ingrained part of our lives, but in reality we’re only hitting adolescence. Conversocial has worked with businesses since their first steps into social media engagement. At the time, this seemed revolutionary to most marketing departments – that customers would speak back, and that companies needed to do something about it. Over the past few years, we’ve come leaps and bounds and today social customer service is a standard concept, program and even team in many businesses.

But we’re still left with questions about what this really is. How will the contact center have to change, with customer support and engagement open to the public? Next week, I’ll be talking about “The Social Engagement Hub” alongside speakers from Edelman Digital, Ogilvy, GoDaddy and Nokia, and what this looks like for the future.

At Conversocial, we’ve worked with marketing, customer service, customer experience, customer insight, product, and sales teams, because social customer service calls for new rules of play for customer relationships. Social media presents opportunities for every part of your organisation – from customer retention in offering service to dissatisfied customers, to new sales from customers grumbling about your competitors. And the wealth of insight available in volunteered social data is wasted if your insight and product teams can’t action it to make better business decisions.

Developing great social customer service is the only way for companies to tap into this. We recently conducted research on the Twitter mentions of some of America’s biggestretailers. In a day in the life of Twitter, it’s astounding what’s out there for the taking. Major opportunities raised by customers constituted over 1/3 of all mentions, and include customer experience, customer dissatisfaction product availability enquiries, sales and pricing questions and service and facilities feedback. We’ll be sharing more of this data on the 19th.

In my vision for the contact center of the future, social relationships with customers sit at the heart of your organisation. Companies will have to consider some serious structural reorganisation of not only how they manage communication with their customers, but also how they perceive it. Customer service will no longer be relegated as an inconvenient cost center, but as the front line of customer engagement.

Join us next Tuesday to discuss market trends, the experiences of leaders in this space and pick the brains of our panel of experts as to how you can start delivering real social customer service in your company. We’ll be opening up discussion that’s relevant for every customer-focused role in your company, so if you’re looking for answers to ‘what is social customer service anyway?’ we should be able to help.

Music Lovers Rejoice: SMW NYC Partners with SoundCtrl & DMW Music

This year, we’re excited to have DMW Music is an official event partner for SMW NYC. What does that mean? DMW Music is 2 day event with 500+ of the most influential music and digital media leaders gathering to socialize, share ideas, do deals and learn about new technologies and services. This two-day event features a music-tech crawl at Pandora, Spotify, YouTube/Google, and iHeartRadio; classroom style presentations; interactive pit sessions, a music awards dinner; and executives from companies such as Sony, YouTube, Warner Music Group, Shazam, VEVO,Universal Music Group, Pandora, and more.

And we want you to be able to take part! We have 20 complimentary passes to distribute to our community. Interested? Just tell us why at #SMWDMWMusic

Now, we want you to learn more about SoundCtrl, the team that helped pull the partnership together. Learn more about Jesse Kirshbaum and SoundCtrl!

Jesse, SoundCtrl is a regular partner for SMW NYC. Why is the convergence of music and tech so important and how is SMW fill that need for SoundCtrl?
Technology is advancing at an exciting pace, with innovators who consistently challenge and evolve our conceptions of how music can be created, shared and consumed. Now more than ever, this is a sensation felt across all industry lines and creates opportunities for us to learn both from each others’ successes and missteps. Social Media Week provides a great context for us to discuss this interconnectivity and as this year’s theme suggests, illuminate the principles for a more collaborative world.

Last February, SoundCtrl produced a special music day for SMW NYC. What do you have in store this year?
Last year was truly a blast. We worked with SMW to created the first ever Music Hub satellite event at Dominion Theatre, with a full day of panels from groups like NYC Nightlife, elektro Magazine and Translation LLC. The discussion was kept lively all day with speakers that included Nick Jonas, Beverly Jackson, Asher Roth, Maura Johnston, David Sonenberg, & Junior Sanchez.

This year, we’re bringing back a very successful part of our hub – a conversation hosted by Zev Norotsky (Executive Publisher, elektro Magazine) about the role of social media in the growth of electronic music in the US and what trends we see developing nationwide. This year, the invite-only event will take place at the SoHo House on Friday, February 22nd and Zev will be joined by Joe Rosenberg (Director of Marketing and Partnerships, AM Only), Tommie Sunshine (DJ, Producer), and others TBA.

The music industry is currently undergoing great changes. What are the biggest factors for this and what trends do you see shaping the future of the industry?
It’s a great time to be in the music industry – the balance of power is shifting away from major conglomerates and towards young entrepreneurs who are in the trenches, seeing the opportunities taking shape in real time and have the flexibility to quickly pivot and execute plan B when plan A fails.

To that end, we’re likely to see increased partnerships between these individuals and their startups in 2013. Creating alliances between well established artist services will be key rather than each service extending themselves into areas where they don’t have a solid foundation (EX: Topsin’s integration with Artist Growth, Fireband, INgrooves Fontana and PledgeMusic).

SoundCtrl is producing your 4th Annual FlashFWD awards, set for this May. Can you tell us a bit more about FlashFWD, and what’s in store for the big event?
We’re very excited about the evolution of the FlashFWD Awards and what you can expect to see this year. To give a little background, FlashFWD is the premiere award ceremony highlighting and honoring individuals & organizations using and developing innovative technology in the music space.

Last year’s honorees included Best in Discovery – Spotify, Best in Live – Square, Best in Mobile & Tablet – Snibbe Interactive for Biophila, Best in Artist Support – BandPage, and our 2012 SoundWAV Influencer – Scooter Braun.

This year’s nomination period is almost underway and community voting will open on all categories (including new category, Best in Gaming) this April. For more information, check in with www.soundctrl.com/flashfwd

This year, NUE Agency, who produces SoundCtrl, has an artist up for a Grammy, one of the most social events in the world. SoundCtrl also helped connect Social Media Week to the Grammy’s both for NYC and LA. Can you tell us more about NUE’s incredible success in this area, and how the Grammy’s have managed to adapt so successfully to social TV and engagement?
We were so excited and proud to be at the GRAMMYS with Wale for his nomination in Best Rap Song for the chart topping single “Lotus Flower Bomb” ft Miguel… going for more nominations next year and the big win.

SoundCtrl was excited to be a part of Grammy Weekend as well where, on Friday, February 8th, we produced the Grammy Music & Technology Lab with The Recording Academy and Zuckerberg Media at LA Live. Participants in the lab included the startups Pheed, Pledge Music, Mixify, Buddy Bounce, and Amplifier (powered by SoundCloud) and we were thrilled to introduce the Academy to these entities and take steps to invest and cultivate these innovative services.

The social team for the Grammys are an amazing group lead by one of our mentors, Beverly Jackson. Their open-mindedness and ability to cultivate & capture the online Grammy chatter in meaningful ways is beyond impressive and it’s no wonder that the 55th GRAMMY Awards were the 2nd most social event of 2013 with over 15.4 million social interactions measured across Twitter, Facebook and entertainment check-in platforms such as Get Glue and Viggle.

SoundCtrl is partnering with DMW, as part of SMW. Can you tell us more about DMW and your relationship?
We’re very pleased that DMW Music and Social Media Week have decided to unite and join forces when it comes to music content for the week. Taking place February 20-21, DMW combines Digital Music Forum East and West into one large event simply named DMW Music. 500+ of the most influential music and digital media leaders will gather in Downtown New York to socialize, share ideas, do deals and learn about new technologies and services. This year’s event will be packed with great content, stellar people and a lot of companies that are new on the music-tech scene.

As a long time friend and supporter of both SMW and DMW, it seemed natural to us that these unique teams should know each other and cross pollinate. SoundCtrl was able to bridge the gap and provide SMW with special registration and access to the great lineup of music and technology industry speakers lined up at DMW this year. Check out the full list here: www.dmw-music.com.

What are you most looking forward to this SMW NYC?
We at SoundCtrl are excited about SMW’s Ideas Connected at the Global HQ. The lineup includes everything from master classes taught by companies like Tumblr & Google+, to an interactive exhibition called “The Internet of Things” which will feature new innovations in connect products and devices. You’ll see us around the HQ all three days and we’re already getting excited to hear from Internet entrepreneur, activist, investor and co-founder of social news website Reddit, Alexis Ohanian.

5 Minutes With Eventbrite


Eventbrite is an online service that people everywhere use to create, share, and join events. Whether a photography class with a local artist, or a sold-out concert in a city stadium, Eventbrite makes it happen. This year, Eventbrite joins SMW NYC as our Premium Pass Sponsor, so we sat down with Eventbrite’s Sara Altier to talk about all things social marketing:

1. Eventbrite relies heavily on social marketing. How has your social media strategy changed over the last year?
Events are social, right? They’re more fun to attend with your friends — so we’ve focused on empowering our attendees to find and share more events.  Based on the data we’ve released with our Social Commerce report, we’ve know that Facebook drives quite a bit of traffic to events. Since our recent integration with Facebook Open Graph, we’ve changed the way we allow attendees to find and share events. We send out monthly “Event Picks” newsletters using data from previous events with high attendance rates, as well as events the recipient’s Facebook friends have signed up for. We’ve also started sending out social notification emails, so if two of your friends are attending the same event, you’ll get a notification.

2. In 2010, Eventbrite was the first company to offer data about the financial benefits of “sharing,” revealing that every time someone shared a paid event on Facebook, it drove an additional $2.52 in revenue back to the event organizer, and 11 additional page views of their event page. Are there any over overwhelming data points, like that one, that inform your social strategy?
This past fall, we released our Global Social Commerce report. Aside from interesting data points like Italy sharing the most and the UK clicking the most, we found that while Twitter shares increase traffic to an event page, Facebook still drives the most revenue. You can check out the report here!

3. Eventbrite was used in over 175 countries in the last year. Do you tailor your social marketing strategy for each country? If so, how do they differ?
In the past year we’ve launched localized sites in 13 countries outside of the US. We offer localized support in 7 different languages and have local City Marketing Managers in 8 of our major metros. We tailor each country’s strategy to best align with the trends and communication patterns of each location.

4. Do you find that marketing “Cause” events requires a different strategy than events with a charitable component? How so?
At the end of the day, marketing all events is essentially the same. Sure, there are differences between marketing cause-related events and marketing sporting events, for example, but the underlying strategy for marketing all events can be boiled down to three points: 1. Know your target audience. 2. Decide on a goal. (Are you more focused on general awareness or a specific amount of money you want to raise?) 3. Craft regular, tailored information that will inspire your target audience to act. Our blog is an excellent resource for event organizers that need a bit more assistance figuring out their strategy!

5. What do you think is the most exciting thing happening in the emerging technology and/or new media space right now? How will that inform your work?
Where to begin! It’s hard to just mention one specific thing, but I think the fact that so many people are embracing new technology to change their lives for the better is the most exciting to me. It’s so humbling that Eventbrite is being used everywhere — from rallying people around an important cause to helping them acquire skills that will empower them to enter a new line of work. We aim to provide a product that will continue evolving and helping our users achieve success in whatever they set out to do.

6. Tell us about your goals for SMW. As a 2013 Premium Pass Sponsor, what do you hope attendees will take away from the experience?
Social media is changing the way we do business in a very fundamental way. I think that a lot of non-industry people’s perception of social media is tainted by the prevalence of cheap buzzwords and too many people claiming to be ‘social media ninjas’. I hope that Premium Pass Holders will come to SMWNYC to make sincere connections and share knowledge about how social media is making measurable impact at companies like Eventbrite.

7. This year, our global theme is “Open & Connected: Principles for a Collaborative World.” How does Eventbrite embody and/or support this idea?
There’s something really magical about bringing an online interaction offline. The fact that our self-service platform enables event organizers from all around the world (179 different countries last year alone!) to bring people together is a true testament to how we support the global theme of Social Media Week, and we couldn’t be happier to be involved!

5 Minutes With Huffington Post’s Roy Sekoff

Yesterday, we helped get things moving towards SMW NYC with our partners, HuffPost Live. Covering how safeguarding free expression and an Open Internet is still a critical issue, they hosted a dynamic exchange on the current issues facing both our country and the global community, with leading thinkers, including: Jillian York of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Andrew Rasiej of Personal Democracy Forum, and Christine Chen of Google and moderated by Ahmed Shihab-Eldin.

Not only was it engaging and get you thinking, but it also displays the professionalism and innovation that represents HuffPost. With their use of Google+ On Air HangOuts, HuffPost Live does live integration of social media better than most.

And we’re thrilled to be partnering with them this year! SMW NYC is honored to have President and co-creator of HuffPost Live, and founding editor of Huffington Post, Roy Sekoff, join us. Before his event, get to know him a bit more:

Roy, this year, our global theme is “Open & Connected: Principles for a Collaborative World.” How does The Huffington Post embody or support this idea?
HuffPost thrives precisely because our staff is utterly committed to all three of these attributes. Openness and transparency are core principles at HuffPost – both culturally and editorially. We are obsessively connected – which is good, because collaboration is the lifeblood of what we do. Rare is the email or GChat that isn’t rapidly – and creatively responded to.

The publishing industry is undergoing change overall; and the Huffington Post has been a leader in that. Where do you see the future of journalism and publishing heading?
HuffPost has been around for almost 8 years. In that time, we have seen the rapid rise of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest, and so many other game-changing products. We adapted and incorporated them all into what we do, but can’t say that we saw them coming. So, in a time like this, one rife with innovation, trying to look into a crystal ball and divine the future seems like a fool’s game.

The Huffington Post has continued to innovate, making waves in social video. How is the development of HuffPost Live leading the way and where do you see social video heading?
With HuffPost Live, we have placed our bet on people’s growing desire to engage with the news – on the shift from presentation to participation. They want to help shape the stories – and the issues – of our time. HuffPost Live was designed as a platform for engagement – one that puts our users front and center in what we do.

What has been the biggest success from HuffPost Live?
Because of our commitment to engagement, we are proudest of our engagement metrics, which confirm that we have created a unique and addictive social and community offering. Over 6,500 guests have joined us from all over the world via Skype and Google Hangouts. Over 750,000 comments have been left on the HuffPost Live platform (with many more left on HuffPost stories that have HuffPost Live videos embedded in them). And our users are spending over 15 minutes on the site per visit.

As more news and media outlets rely upon citizen journalism, how can the issue of accuracy and accountability be adapted? What recommendations would you have for smaller outlets just getting started?
Accuracy and accountability are vital. For us, that means doing everything we can to assure the accuracy of what we publish, and moving quickly and transparently to correct any mistakes that are made.

Advertorials have come under scrutiny lately, and we’re seeing many outlets experiment with different revenue models. What trends are you seeing for media and entertainment outlets maintaining a profit?
As the old models plateau, brands are clearly looking for fresh ways to reach consumers. And it’s important for publishers to try to lead the way in that innovation – but it’s critical not to blur the lines. Consumers value high-quality content, whether it comes from publishers or advertisers, but they should never be confused about the source. Our key touchstones are authenticity and transparency.

What are you most excited about for SMW NYC?
Thursday’s session on “The Shift from Presentation to Participation.” It will be a great discussion.

We couldn’t agree more. A big thanks to Roy for taking the time to talk with us. Make sure you check him out in-person this SMW NYC or join via livestream!

Google+ Hangouts at SMW NYC: Live Tonight And More!

We’ve got some big news, and we want you to join us. Grab your laptop, and get ready for SMW NYC interaction on a new level…

SMW13 is partnering up with HuffPost Live

Today, at 5pm EST, our media partner HuffPost Live covers how safeguarding free expression and an Open Internet is still a critical issue.  Watch the exchange on the current issues facing both our country and the global community, with leading thinkers, including: Jillian York of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Andrew Rasiej of Personal Democracy Forum, and Christine Chen of Google.

With their use of Google+ On Air HangOuts, HuffPost Live does live integration of social media better than most.  

Check it out and share your comments. The conversation doesn’t stop on HuffPost Live.

Join us today here, but don’t get too settled. That’s just the beginning of what we are doing with Google+!


Google+ Contest

We asked our community to come up, and then host, incredible Hangouts during SMW13, with the best one recieving a $5k prize! Over 40 events were chosen to participate! From chatting about education with girls in underdeveloped nations, to cooking tortillas, there is a wide range of Hangouts for you to chose from and participate in. Tune-in. Tell us which SMW user Hangouts you think are best, and we’ll unveil the winner following SMW13. See them all here.


Hangout During SMW NYC

In addition to the above collaborations, you can join in and watch during SMW NYC! We are thrilled to feature two incredible Hangouts:

Wednesday, Feb. 20th from 2:30 – 4pm: Daria Musk and Google: Social Media and the Rock Star
If you’re looking for a bit more fun, then you want to head to Hearst (or G+!) to see Daria Musk. An Internet sensation, she’s taken over Google+ to expand her reach musically. She may even give you a performance or two…


Warby Parker and Google+

Warby Parker: the latest business sensation. Google+: the stable but creative force. Together. From February 19 to 21, Ideas Connected at the Global HQ will feature an installation which allows users to interact via Google Hangout. Pulling in some surprise attendees, one thing you do know is it’ll be fun and spot-on. If you’re in town, make to check it out live.

Head over to Google+, and try out a Hangout as well. We look forward to seeing you online and in-person!

Nokia x SMWNYC: See Them In Action

Being their third year powering SMW, our friends at Nokia have really come to SMW NYC with some amazing ideas around engaging our audience.

Nokia is no stranger to our SMW NYC community- and we love having them here! In addition to powering our mobile app, SMW Live and SMW RealTime so you can truly engage on numerous levels, they are making their presence known. Starting off with offering Nokia Lumia 920 trials to our community, Nokia x SMW NYC got running early, and isn’t letting up. Making sure the week begins and ends with a bang, Nokia is one of the main forces behind the Opening & Closing Parties. Given their past with us, we’re expecting some fun surprises for the attendees…

Nokia is also making sure SMW NYC attendees don’t miss a beat with an incredible Simulcast set-up at the Global HQ. Streaming events from all over SMW13 and SMWNYC with incredible Monster Wireless Headsets, if you’re nearby, you want to see this. You can also get powered up by using the Nokia Charging Station- you know your phones and computers need it.

But don’t forget to swing by their Photo Lab to see the power of the PureView Camera on the latest Nokia Lumia 920’s. Don’t worry, we’ll be sending them to your FaceBook profiles to share… Speaking of photos, Nokia has partnered to bring the 1197 Mobile Photography Conference to SMW NYC. With 3 days of programming and an interactive gallery, it’s the perfect place for you if you love your camera, your phone and combining the two.

Want to learn something? Nokia #SmarterEveryday is making sure you get the most of your experience by providing the Master Classroom at Global HQ, letting you get hands-on learning from some of the best in the biz. From leaders like Tumblr to Dachis Group to Nokia@Work, Global HQ attendees will walk away with knowledge they can immediately use. Nokia is behind some of our Master Classes like Designing Your Day: Maximize Your Brain, Maximize Your Day. Taught by Paul McGinniss, you’ll be given the neuroscience perspective on how to work with your brain to get the most out of your day- like what are the times of day when you are at your cognitive best?

There’s also Designing your day: Practical Tools to boost your creativity & productivity. To help you truly work smarter, this Master Class will give you the tools to help you reconsider your workday and understand what’s getting in the way of your best work; redesigning the way you work. You’ll leave with ideas and tools you can use to give you more get time to do the things you really love.

Then see the team on stage. Starting with Designing A Smarter Everyday, presented by Nokia@Work, as part of the Smarter Everyday series, this event takes the a considered approach using design thinking and similar models about how to work more effectively everyday. They’ll ask the questions of what does the perfect day look like; what are the best strategies for structuring a day to get the most from it; and more. If you’re serious about being productive and getting your start-up off the ground, these strategies are for you.

Moving to a different theme, The Social Engagement Hub: Re-Imagining The Contact Center As A Critical Marketing Tool brings on Sean Valderas, Nokia Care’s Social Media Manager, to join other brand’s customer service managers to discuss what a Social Engagement Hub looks like and why social customer service is so crucial.

If you haven’t seen Nokia’s Global Head of Digital and Social, Craig Hepburn, yet, you are missing out. SMW NYC is your opportunity. Swing by Bloomberg’s Business & Entrepreneurship Hub as he shares his experiences for Social as The Great Equalizer: Interviews With Companies Large and Small.

Rounding it all out, Nokia wraps up SMW NYC with something they’re passionate about- music. In partnership with SoundCtrl, Nokia Music is bringing a Music Day to SMW NYC. With Rock It: How to Drive Brand Awareness and Social Action Through Music Partnerships, you’ll be able to see how social is driving music and how Nokia Music is working with bands to provide a different music experience.

Unleash Your Inner Chef: Special Offer for Next 300 HQ Pass Buyers

Purchase a HQ Pass to Ideas Connected during Social Media Week and receive a one week trial to Plated.com

Recently profiled in the New York Times, Plated is disrupting the way we eat. They deliver all of the ingredients their customers need to cook fantastic top chef-designed recipes — plus beautiful how-to instructions. They are building the platform to create, share and monetize food experiences with social commerce.

As part of a promotion with Social Media Week, they are giving the next 300 people who purchase an HQ Pass to Ideas Connected a one week free trial of Plated — estimated value $60. Get your pass now!

“Unleash your inner chef — everything you need to cook a top chef-designed meal, delivered to your door.”

NonProfit Guide to SMW NYC

At a Social Media Week party last year, I asked a very accomplished entrepreneur, “so, will I see you at SXSW?” He looked at me and smirked, “I don’t go there anymore because everybody is there.” I see what he means. It’s important for a conference to maintain the right balance of top people in the field, great programming and accessibility — that is Social Media Week.

As a nonprofit professional at SMW, I always feel catered to as there are plenty events on using the powers of social media for social good. I also tend to veer from my track to learn from other industries and network with the speakers post event to pitch a corporate partnership (as any self-respecting nonprofit hustler would do).

Here are my top picks for SMW NYC. Also for networking, looks like the Society & Social Impact Hub at 92Y Tribeca is the place for us. See you there!

Tuesday, February 19
Using Film to Galvanize Lasting Social Change
GIVING GANGNAM STYLE: An Ideathon with the #GivingTuesday Team #SMWGT
Rewiring Government for Openness, Connection, and Choice, Featuring Susan Crawford and Beth Noveck
Open and Unfiltered: Defending the Internet, Featuring Alexis Ohanian and Eli Pariser
Keeping Up with the Agile Consumer
Authors Roundtable: Social at the Intersection of Paid, Owned and Earned Media

Wednesday, February 20
A Conversation with Neil Blumenthal, Co-Founder and CEO, Warby Parker
Content Marketing: How to be Memorable and Measurable in 2013
Lean Startup for Social Good: Create a Compelling Website User Experience Using Lean UX

Thursday, February 21
How Social Is Your Foundation?
Societal Brands In a Social World
Social Media Analytics Helps UNICEF Save Lives

Friday, February 22
Keynote: danah boyd on the Ethics and Challenges of Dealing With “Big Data”

Hub Spotlight: 5 Minutes With 92Y’s Asha Curran

Each year, we partner with iconic institutions to bring you dedicated content for SMW NYC. 92Y is the city’s premiere nonprofit cultural and community center, and they’ve been all about social good since 1874! 92Y will be serving as our Society & Social Impact Hub, and we couldn’t think of a better home for those conversations. Now, we want you to meet Asha Curran, Director for Center for Innovation & Social Impact at 92Y. As director of the Center for Innovation & Social Impact, Asha Curran works to expand the depth and reach of 92Y’s programming through social media, partnerships and collaboration within 92Y’s diverse programming centers. She’s also been working with our team to help pull together the programming for the week and make sure you have a great experience there, while learning how we can all make the world a little better.

Asha, how did 92Y get involved with SMW NYC?
92Y has become more and more active in programming in the social media space, from hosting the last AllThingsD event with Walt Mossberg, Kara Swisher and Eric Schmidt, to our multi-platform partnerships with places like Mashable, Politico, Buzzfeed, Comedy Central Indecision and others. We’re thrilled to be the Society & Social Impact hub for this year’s SMW, since it’s so aligned with what we do—with social media specifically but with our mission in general. As a Jewish institution, we’ve been serving the community since 1874 have always strived to meet emerging social needs. A commitment to service, as well as a passion for ideas, is core to our mission.

This year, our global theme is “Open & Connected: Principles for a Collaborative World.” How does 92Y embody or support this idea?
92Y is a community center that has been encouraging open dialogue, engagement and enrichment for 139 years, but evolving technology and new media offer us the chance to radically expand our definition of community and engagement. We’re strong advocates of the use of social media to catalyze social change, and of encouraging the connected generation to tackle the world’s biggest challenges by using the technological and new media tools at their disposal. The idea of collaboration is becoming more and more central to what we do—collaborating to draw together all the genius of our various programming departments, to start with, but also reaching outside our organization to partner with NGOs, media companies, other NFPs and big businesses to create amazing collaborative programs, and to leverage those networks to share the content more widely.

The Social Good Summit that we present every fall in partnership with the UNFoundation, Mashable, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the UN Development Programme is centered entirely on the theme of using social media for social good, and focused on the principles of openness and accessibility, crowd-sourced solutions, grassroots thinking, and empowerment of local communities.

92Y is well known for your incredible programs- from comedy to arts to film. Can you tell us more about how 92Y has evolved and why providing those programs is so crucial to the community?
Intellectual exploration (in whatever form—classes, lectures, art, music, dance) has a more important place than ever in such a frenetic, multi-tasking world. We’re becoming a society which digests a neverending firehose of content in short-form servings, often in solitude, and in which people often gravitate to that content which reinforces what they already think. But vigorous debate is so crucial; the hardest conversations are often the most important ones to have, and real growth and progress can’t happen without being open to new ideas, new positions. It’s the engagement itself which is valuable. Our mission is to provide education and entertainment at with depth and thoughtfulness, with many points of entry and many voices. Most experiences are richer when they’re had with a community.

If you walk through either 92Y location, you might hear the strains of a string quartet rehearsing from the concert hall, or a jazz band in the Tribeca mainstage, the voices of children and their parents, the instructions of an art or jewelry teacher, or a group of strangers getting to know each other over a glass of wine before the start of a lecture. And with our digital work as well, our goal is to get people together, learning, talking, engaging, taking action.

The nonprofit and social impact space is deeply impacted by social and emerging media. What trends do you see taking shape in this area?
Technology now allows us as a not-for-profit (or, as we call ourselves, a for-purpose) to scale our core values of community, connection, conversation, and philanthropy, and reach a much wider audience. That’s an amazing opportunity and we’re taking full advantage of it. We’re big believers in the potential of what we call the “connected generation”—not just young people, but all people who are technologically savvy, engaged, lateral thinkers, and hungry for social change and willing to work to make it happen. The ability of communities—of anyone—to curate powerful, influential conversations via social media, to rally people around an idea, is having a profound impact even on the national agenda. The old power model is changing.

What are some of the success stories from 92Y in social & emerging media?
92Y founded and led #GivingTuesday, a national day of giving to follow on the heels of Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Our original goal was to gather 100 partners in support of the idea. Instead, we had 2,500 by the time the day itself came around. The White House endorsed the idea, as did the Mayors of New York, Philly and Chicago; it received nationwide press and Blackbaud, a not-for-profit software company who gathered analytics for us, estimated that online giving went up over 50% year over year for that date. It was a phenomenal success that spoke to the philanthropic nature of Americans, the sheer power of social media, and the eagerness of communities to rally together in support of a cause.

Our annual Social Good Summit, now in its fourth year, reached a record number of people last year due to the combined social media reach of our partners Mashable, UNFoundation, the Gates Foundation, the UN Development Programme and Ericsson. We held the flagship event here in NYC, livestreamed simultaneously in seven languages, with hub events in Beijing, Nairobi and Mogadishu, as well as over 300 local community meetups around the world in over 150 countries. Each meetup was held around one question: “what can technology and new media do to improve conditions in your community?” We received incredible feedback from localities from Austin to Syria to Bhutan to Bangalore.

92Y also began 92Y American Conversation this past year, which is a multi-platform initiative to share the best in 92Y political content as widely as possible. We partnered with Harvard Kennedy School, Comedy Central Indecision, Politico, the Aspen Institute and many more to create new, original content as well as share the best moments from our stage. We’ve seen hundreds of thousands of views and media pickups from HuffPo to the NY Times.

What should SMW NYC attendees expect to see from 92Y Tribeca and at the Society & Social Impact Hub?
We’ll host a range of great programs on topics from urban development to visual social media to the ethical challenges of “big data.” I’m particularly excited for “Giving Gangnam Style: An Ideathon with the #GivingTuesday Team” (Tuesday, Feb 19th at 12pm) and for “Grassroots + Social=Change” (Wednesday, Feb 20th at 2:30pm), which we’ve programmed in partnership with our good friends at Mashable and which will speak on the theme of social media as a catalyst for societal change, which is at the heart of so much of our work.

Going Social: Meet Nokia’s Brad Spikes

Nokia is back and in full force! We’ve been working with Nokia’s Brad Spikes, coordinating some amazing things for SMW13. From photo labs at Ideas Connected at Global HQ to #SmarterEverday events to help enhance how you work, we can’t wait to show off all that we’ve been planning together! Now, meet the man helping us pull together.

Brad, how long have you been with Nokia, and what gets you most excited about your work with them?
I have been with Nokia a little more than 11 years. It really is an exciting place to work– the dynamic environment of working in the mobile industry coupled with the always present need to adapt & evolve. Additionally, there is a wealth of talented and globally diverse people at Nokia who are extremely passionate about their work. I feel quite fortunate to come into the office each day surrounded by exciting challenges amongst colleagues who are dedicated to the cause.

How has social helped Nokia differentiate itself in the mobile space?
I believe it is not so much strictly differentiation as it is a natural progression for Nokia, with regards to what has been a core to our company DNA for a very long time – connecting people. From offering people in emerging markets their first mobile phone, to our smartphones based on the Windows Phone platform, which is inherently very social, to our blog, Nokia Conversations, that helps us connect with our fans worldwide – social is a part of nearly everything we do.

And we take it one step further. When you consider the differentiation of our phones in areas such as imaging, design, and location, we are enabling consumers to capture & share their experiences in entirely new ways (and look good while they do it).

What recent Nokia campaigns would our supporters in NYC be familiar with?
The Nokia #Switch campaign has been a key push for us. It centers on the idea of asking consumers about what would convince them to switch to a Lumia smartphone. We constantly curate consumer feedback from social channels and share their messages via our digital switch hub.

Nokia is entering as a heavy player with mobile photography and is powering some great activities for February, from 1197 and Photo Labs at our Global HQ. Can you tell us a bit more about the key features of the Lumia camera and why imaging is so important to Nokia?
Imaging is an area of strength and differentiation for Nokia, and we’re always innovating here. It really comes back to what I was saying earlier about taking the experience one step further and addressing some of the feedback that we hear from people using cameras on their phones in everyday life. For example, how many times have you tried to take a picture with friends in a restaurant, club or at an evening event and someone has their eyes closed, is looking away, or the photo turns out blurry or too dark to share? Using the camera on a Lumia 920 along with our Smart Shoot lens helps you address all of these common photo pitfalls and capture the moment.

One of my favorite features for the new Lumia smartphones is Cinemagraph, which enables you to create animated GIFs and share them with your social networks. Check out the Nokia conversations post HERE which shares some really cool examples of Cinemagraph as well as how easy it is to share your creations with family & friends on your social networks.

What do you hope to see Nokia accomplish over the next 12 months?
I can’t begin to tell you how excited I am about where we are headed in social this year! Continuing to have quality conversations with both our existing fans/followers remains a core focus and we are always working to engage with new audiences about our products. Sharing the Nokia story through social and the friends we make along the way is such a rewarding experience. Further, building & fostering relationships with consumers is absolutely critical and the best part is it’s something we truly enjoy doing!

Make sure you swing by the Global HQ to see Nokia in action and say hi to Brad!

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