Christian Borges’ Fave 5 for SMW NYC

Christian Borges, a leader in the world of marketing, has led a impressive career focused on  reputation and social media strategies that help brands connect with customers wherever they are. Christian is the currently the Senior Vice President of Marketing at true[X] media, a company that helps brands increase engagement and capture the true attention of their customers. We are really excited that he will be joining us for Social Media Week again this year — so, we asked him to share with us some of his favorite events in our lineup this year.

In his words:

First, let me say that boiling down this year’s list of scheduled sessions down to a Top Fave 5 was no easy task. Seriously. This year’s list of topics seemingly takes the SMW NYC experience to the next level, both with regards to relevant, meaningful content and knowledgeable expert speakers. Excited as always to be a part of it!

My Fave Five:

  1. Masterclass: Impulse Response, A Strategic Approach to Algorithmic Encounters
    Wait – I get the chance to learn and interact with the NYTimes R&D Lab and learn about movement tracking and facial recognition, etc.? The Future of Now, damn straight!
  2. Masterclass: Building Wearables: A Hands-On Intro to Open-Source Interaction Platforms
    I’m both personally and professionally obsessed with all things #wearabletech, and see this vertical as one of the key drivers of data and intelligence for marketers in the very near future.
  3. The Future of Social Music, Presented by Spotify
    Music and advertising have forever been linked. In the past few years, music consumption has experienced such a drastic and aggressive transformation with the explosion of streaming music services such as iTunes, Pandora, Spotify, and the newly launched Beats (amongst many others). Where’s it all going?
  4. It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens, a Conversation with Author danah boyd and Andrew Rasiej
    I am a HUGE fan of dana boyd, one of the preeminent experts and researchers on all-things related to privacy and youth-culture. Now more than ever, as a father of two little men, her words of data-driven intelligence and insight resonate with me more than ever before. When danah speaks, I listen.
  5. Man vs. Machine: Advertising’s Epic Battle for Human Attention
    How can brands and agencies compete in an attention-driven economy? Joe Marchese has a vision: less advertising that delivers more powerful storytelling for greater effectiveness. If you can’t handle the truth, don’t come to this session.

Honorable Mention:
The Changing Face of News Consumption, Hosted by WSJ
The past few months has seen the launch of such renegade news outlets as The Information, The Ozy, and even re/code. Couple that with the likes of Circa, Pulse, Flipboard – the shift in news consumption has in fact become the news.

Social Media Week, February 17-21, is fast-approaching so register now! Christian said it himself- choosing just five is hard! So make sure to check out the amazing lineup of other events that you won’t want to miss!

Storytelling and Journalism in the Digital Age: 5 Events You Need at SMW NYC

Digital media’s searchability, sharability and speed are changing the way that we interact with news. Join the conversation as we look at what this means for journalists, marketers and the stories we share!

  1. The Art & Science of Storytelling
    Even as we change the ways in which we consume and share content- some things don’t change. The need to tell a compelling story is here to stay. EVP of Advertising at the NYTimes, Meredith Kopit Levien, will dive into new platforms for creating value and sharing engaging content to help you master the art of storytelling for yourself.
  2. Is Social Killing Storytelling?
    Well is it? If you are feeling cramped by your character limit or the attention span of your readers, this panel hosted by AOL is here to help. Explore what social media means for storytellers and the ways that social media can be leveraged to share long-form content (because not everything can be said in a tweet).
  3. Calling All Journalists: How to Rebrand Yourself as a Content Marketing & Social Expert
    Just because there might be fewer opportunities for writers in traditional print media roles, does not mean that there are fewer total opportunities. This panel of seasoned professionals will help you polish your resume, master the vocab and connect with the wealth of opportunities for journalists to partner with brands in creating content that connects with readers and customers.
  4. Investigative Reporting for the Web: Is Anything Different?
    Investigative journalism plays a pivotal role in society, exposing exploitation and injustices happening right under our noses. However, in the age of the Internet, opinions abound and facts can be scarce. Pioneers in the field from BuzzFeed, Propublic, Rueters and the Washington Post will discuss the facts and the role the web plays in the Rennaissance of investigative reporting.
  5. The Changing Face of News Consumption, Hosted by WSJ
    Wondering what skills today’s journalists, reporters and editors need to have to succeed in the new mobile news economy? Or which demographic is driving the changes and trends in news delivery? This event hosted by the WSJ will answer these questions and more, introducing you to innovators in the field including, Neal Mann of the WSJ, Anthony de Rosa of Circa and Jim Roberts of Mashable.

Storytelling and journalism are important themes at SMW14, February 18 to 21, but don’t forget about the wealth of other engaging topics, like marketing, health & wellness and entrepreneurship! And did we mention the parties?

Registration is open! Check out the schedule, then get your pass today here, and join us and our partners, Nokia and MKG, for what will be a great week of exploring our always on, always connected world.

Surveying the Visual Social Media Landscape

As you might have read on Mashable, this Getty stock photo was widely circulated through social media in the wake of hurricane Sandy and purported to be a shot of the storm approaching New York, an example of one problem discussed during Tuesday’s Social Media Week panel.

Tuesday’s “The Rise of Visual Social Media” panel, moderated by Rubina Madan Fillion (Social Media Editor, The Wall Street Journal), featuring Sean Mann (Social Media Editor, The Wall Street Journal), Sion Fullana (Freelance Photographer), Liz Eswein (Co-Founder, The Mobile Media Lab), and Brian DiFeo (Co-Founder, The Mobile Media Lab) honed in on various aspects of the current state of visual social media, remaining largely within the Instagram realm.

In the culture that procrastinates by staring at posts of aggregated pictures of everything from puppies to family portraits, complacency may characterize our relationship with visual social media. Images are simply captured, consumed, and cast aside across a multitude of social media platforms. We are a community of SnapChat-like consumers. Do you actually remember what your friend’s wedding dress looked like from the photos you looked through for 20 minutes on Facebook? Didn’t think so.

Most of the panelists of Tuesday’s talk at 92Y Tribeca seem, like most of us, to take an observational role in the landscape of visual social media. Rather than discuss where technology is taking us and the cultural implications of these changes, whether they manifest themselves in the way we communicate with each other, frame our understanding of the world, or maintain (or don’t) our culture in an increasingly globalized world, the discussion almost exclusively orbited Instagram, “photoshopped” images, and how to take a good mobile photo.

Questions of practical issues were also discussed among the panelists, such as what should be done about any entity that republishes an image without attribution or credit, a very real concern in today’s world of unlimited content. Mann attempted to push the discussion to a wider vantage point by patiently cutting to the center of each question with targeted observations and commentary. Glimpses of deeper conversation were seen, but not explored in depth.

Despite this, each panelist pulled from their varying professional experiences to weave together a lively discussion. Mann assured audience members that news agencies have checks and balances, namely jigsaw replication (piecing together a scene of an event by looking at images taken from various angles by different people present), in place to avoid printing or publishing fraudulent images, while Fullana urged caution, citing a prominent Spanish publication that paid 30,000 Euro for an adulterated photograph. DiFeo and Eswein, with their extensive knowledge of Instagram, weighed in on the omnipresence and ease of photo-altering apps. According to Eswein, the presence of filters on mobile phone cameras is “just an evolution of how filters have been enabled previously” and offers the ability to bring out nuances of a photo. DiFeo assured listeners that a photo filtered the wrong way would jump out at them.

One such moment occurred when the panelists discussed newcomer to the visual social media scene, Vine, a platform for creating six-second videos and what they see as the limitations of this new format. Fullana cites our decreasing attention spans as a major obstacle to Vine’s success in the news industry, claiming no one would invest six seconds in a video when they could instantaneously gauge their interest in a story from their reaction to a photo. Fullana’s claim seems akin to promoting a movie through posters rather than trailers and, therefore, rather shortsighted. The panel seemed to unanimously agree that Vine contextually doesn’t work for news coverage because Vine videos are planned and edited rather than shot in the moment. But what if Vine-like videos, produced through this app or another technology, could prove to be the movie trailers of feature news stories Couldn’t they be more attractive than a correspondent or anchor’s one sentence pitch?  I wish, instead, they had discussed what it means for modern-day reporting if a package of six seconds or 140 characters is seen as too much content.

Maybe no one knows what advancements in visual social media mean for an array of visual industries, but Social Media Week is the best time to contemplate that horizon. Conjecture may be all we have at this point, but that’s where the exciting ideas and innovations happen. If the talk had dabbled more in the unknown, everyone’s passion for visual social media would have been more fulfilled.

Linnea Zielinski is a freelance project assistant and intern at Serious Eats and a grad student studying publishing at NYU SCPS.

Top image courtesy of istwitterwrong
“Rise of visual social media explained in a pic of the audience – almost all on their mobile phones #smwvisual” Photo and Tweet by Sean Mann (@fieldproducer)

Friday Finale… Finally For Me

This is a guest post by Anna Choi.

 

While the end was near for dedicated attendees of Social Media Week New York City, Friday was just the beginning of my experience. There was no time to waste and after debating over the serious line up of various events, I was ready for my first SMWNYC gathering.

 
What Real Time Marketing Really Takes
Emily Steel from the Wall Street Journal led the panel discussion including Beth Waxman-Arteta of JWT, Ryan Davis of Blue State Digital, Bill Wolff of Primetime Programming, and Mike Sommers of Viggle at the Advertising and Marketing Content Hub at JWT. Topics from preparing for and challenge with real time marketing were touched on with much talk about the type transition period social media is fueling.

And what did I take away?

  • HR/human power is essential behind real time social media, real thought processing and relevance is needed to sustain engagement.
  • Every brand could use real time marketing, how it’s executed may differ.
  • Advertising agencies will transition into “brand content” agencies so the meaning of CMO may be defined as editors of content. Simply put, “real time” marketing will be just marketing in the future.
  • People/consumers are looking for substance and authenticity.
  • Filtration of information is diminishing, as communication is becoming more real/raw.
  • Currently real time marketing is a mixture of PR, social media, and brand management.
  • The thing about authenticity is that it’s imperfect sometimes. Mistakes happen.

 
Future of Social Technology
Michoel Ogince of Big Fuel and Jason Kincaid of TechCrunch discussed their predictions/opinions on the future of social networks/technology at the Global Society Content Hub at Big Fuel Headquarters. The conversation circled around the topic of humanization and the complex human behavior that social technology has yet to mirror perfectly. It was great to hear the opposing sides that Michoel and Jason brought especially when Path was brought up. They did agree that this is still the early stage of social technology and that if we think it’s really social right now, we’re wrong.

But the discussion also touched on:

  • Facebook: is it a place to dump a ton of content?
  • Social gaming (Zynga in particular): gamers invest a lot of money and time in the beginning but it dies off, they hit a wall.
  • App Store’s future: currently it’s a challenge to find/access specific apps.
  • Far future: social technology will be penetrated in every aspect to “friending” objects such as your fridge.
  • Advice for entrepreneurs: be driven by passion, don’t cling on to every “success story advice”.
  • There will be “niche networks” for social media/technology in the future.

 
Left Brain Meets Right Brain –The Blueprints for a Sophisticated Social Marketing Campaign (hosted by Shoutlet)
Jason Weaver, the CEO of Shoutlet, led this discussion including David Armano of Edelman Digital, Doug O-Reilly of MWW, Chris Eichman of Rayovac, and Brenda Schmerl of Reader’s Digest. The hour-or-so long conversation revolved around the controversial topic of left brain, right brain, or both. Planning and organizing people who are left-brain dominant among those who are right-brain dominant seemed to be key in finding the balance for a company. There was a debate over people who were both, or a hybrid, and if this category even existed. David Armano walked everyone through what he called a community engagement blueprint when touching on the subject of scenario planning. Improvisation seemed to be a theme for reacting effectively, with the main focus on being able to utilize the strengths of those who are creative and those who are analytical.

My overall impression of Social Media Week NYC was great. (especially since is FREE!) Being a student that is always seeking for more real world information, besides a textbook or some year-old case study, these events left me satisfied. Actually, I take that back, SMW has left me hungry and on the edge of my seat in excitement for what’s next. Being a part of the generation that really digs deep into the data of this social realm is fresh and transformational. I truly can’t wait to see how what’s trending now transitions into traditional.
 

Anna is a quirky senior at Virginia Tech studying Marketing and International Business. She is curious and thirsty for anything related to social media and brands. Anna aspires to work in an environment that’s constantly battling between the trending and traditional. When she’s not geeking over new digital happenings you can find her working on her new healthy lifestyle and obsessing over froyo. Follow her on twitter @achoi12 or dig deeper on her personal blog, achoi12.tumblr.com, or marketing blog, annanciate.tumblr.com.